Title: Divergent (Divergent #1)

Author: Veronica Roth

Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books

Genre: Dystopian

Age Range: 14+

Release Date: May 03, 2011

Pages: 487 (hardcover)

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent).

On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is—she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself. 

She renames herself Tris during the initiation while struggling with love, trust, and friendship. She tries her best to keep to herself about a secret and threats that could ruin the perfect society that she lives in. When Tris is put to the test to save the ones she loves, will she pull through and save them or fail and lose them?

 

4.7/5 I’m still shocked that I actually really enjoyed this book. This book is one of those book that makes me never want to underestimate a book again.

At the beginning of the story, it was so boring that I had to stop a few times because I couldn’t take just how slow-paced it was. It wasn’t until somewhere in the middle when it finally picked up (only a bit) and I started enjoying the book. What I didn’t like about this book is that it reminded me a lot of The Hunger Games because even though this book is in a different place, I felt like the idea was very similar. I also didn’t like how emotional Tris got throughout the better half of the book. Veronica Roth wanted to make it clear that Tris was a very strong girl. And, yes, even though Tris does face very hard, very unbearable things throughout it, I still felt that she also cried when it was over something small and I would roll my eyes at her. A lot.

The ending of Divergent really surprised me because I actually wasn’t expecting it ( I had a hunch but that was it). What I liked about this book is that Tris got to experience new things while still learning old things as well. The different names and traits of each faction was a bit hard for me to remember, but once they stuck, I realized just how much I loved them.The names are so very clever. I loved how they had to follow a certain dress code and a certain way of life that was different for each faction. So much happened in the ending that it made me pay more attention because I knew that something big was going to happen. The ending to this book is amazing and I laughed a lot in the middle and near the end.

Even though I found Veronica Roth’s book to be slow, she made up for it with a smashing ending that not only put Tris’ strengths to the test but also the strengths’ of the people she loved and cared about too. I recommend this book to anyone who doesn’t mind slow books with great endings with characters that are easy to get attached to.           

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Divergent By Veronica Roth

4.7

Title: Divergent (Divergent #1)

Author: Veronica Roth

Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books

Genre: Dystopian

Age Range: 14+

Release Date: May 03, 2011

Pages: 487 (hardcover)

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent).

On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is—she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

She renames herself Tris during the initiation while struggling with love, trust, and friendship. She tries her best to keep to herself about a secret and threats that could ruin the perfect society that she lives in. When Tris is put to the test to save the ones she loves, will she pull through and save them or fail and lose them?

4.7/5 I’m still shocked that I actually really enjoyed this book. This book is one of those book that makes me never want to underestimate a book again.

At the beginning of the story, it was so boring that I had to stop a few times because I couldn’t take just how slow-paced it was. It wasn’t until somewhere in the middle when it finally picked up (only a bit) and I started enjoying the book. What I didn’t like about this book is that it reminded me a lot of The Hunger Games because even though this book is in a different place, I felt like the idea was very similar. I also didn’t like how emotional Tris got throughout the better half of the book. Veronica Roth wanted to make it clear that Tris was a very strong girl. And, yes, even though Tris does face very hard, very unbearable things throughout it, I still felt that she also cried when it was over something small and I would roll my eyes at her. A lot.

The ending of Divergent really surprised me because I actually wasn’t expecting it ( I had a hunch but that was it). What I liked about this book is that Tris got to experience new things while still learning old things as well. The different names and traits of each faction was a bit hard for me to remember, but once they stuck, I realized just how much I loved them.The names are so very clever. I loved how they had to follow a certain dress code and a certain way of life that was different for each faction. So much happened in the ending that it made me pay more attention because I knew that something big was going to happen. The ending to this book is amazing and I laughed a lot in the middle and near the end.

Even though I found Veronica Roth’s book to be slow, she made up for it with a smashing ending that not only put Tris’ strengths to the test but also the strengths’ of the people she loved and cared about too. I recommend this book to anyone who doesn’t mind slow books with great endings with characters that are easy to get attached to.

Thirteen Reasons Why By Jay Asher

4.5/5 This book is different than the rest of the suicidal books I’ve read because Hannah Baker is already dead.

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a mysterious box with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers thirteen cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker, his classmate and crush who committed suicide two weeks earlier.On tape, Hannah explains that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out how he made the list.

What I don’t like about this books is that even though one point of view was written in italics and the other one wasn’t, I still kept forgetting who was talking and who wasn’t because in some parts it would be a line from Hanna and then right after, a line from Clay. And I felt like Clay’s reason wasn’t as intense as the other reasons Hannah explains. It seemed like nothing actually, but I liked the other reasons.

What I do like about this book is how Hannah feels about every reason, and how she starts every reason from the beginning to the end so that everyone who was listening would know and understand the full story about what happened. The thought that went into every reason is amazing, Jay Asher really wanted this to be realistic and somewhat sadistic towards readers (I got pretty paranoid after reading one reason that I just could open my blinds). The characters are original and really do seem like actual teenagers who do weird things. Also, when Clay talked about the signs for depression and the ways he could have helped her, I loved how it was vague yet specific at the same time so that this book could also be something for people to relate to and also look to for answer on how to tell whether someone is depressed or not.  Jay asher’s first novel is a for sure read for anyone who loves reading about realistic teens doing horrible things to themselves and to others. And finding a way for it to never happen to someone they know.

Thirteen Reasons Why By Jay asher

4.5/5 This book is different than the rest of the suicidal books I’ve read because Hannah Baker is already dead.

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a mysterious box with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers thirteen cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker, his classmate and crush who committed suicide two weeks earlier.On tape, Hannah explains that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out how he made the list.

What I don’t like about this books is that even though one point of view was written in italics and the other one wasn’t, I still kept forgetting who was talking and who wasn’t because in some parts it would be a line from Hanna and then right after, a line from Clay. And I felt like Clay’s reason wasn’t as intense as the other reasons Hannah explains. It seemed like nothing actually, but I liked the other reasons.

What I do like about this book is how Hannah feels about every reason, and how she starts every reason from the beginning to the end so that everyone who was listening would know and understand the full story about what happened. The thought that went into every reason is amazing, Jay Asher really wanted this to be realistic and somewhat sadistic towards readers (I got pretty paranoid after reading one reason that I just could open my blinds). The characters are original and really do seem like actual teenagers who do weird things. Also, when Clay talked about the signs for depression and the ways he could have helped her, I loved how it was vague yet specific at the same time so that this book could also be something for people to relate to and also look to for answer on how to tell whether someone is depressed or not.  Jay asher’s first novel is a for sure read for anyone who loves reading about realistic teens doing horrible things to themselves and to others. And finding a way for it to never happen to someone they know.

That Summer By Sarah Dessen

3.6/5 I was so disappointed with this book but I guess that’s why this is her first book.

For fifteen-year-old Haven, life is changing too quickly. She’s nearly six feet tall, her father is getting remarried, and her sister—the always perfect Ashley—is planning a wedding of her own. Haven wishes things could just go back to the way they were. Then an old boyfriend of Ashley’s reenters the picture, and through him, Haven sees the past for what it really was, and comes to grips with the future.

What I don’t like about this book is that Haven doesn’t fall in love with someone. I thought she would find someone-anyone to go out with like in all of her other books but nothing like that happens. Also that the message in this book is clear at times but fuzzy at others, I wish Sarah Dessen was consistent like how she is with her more recent novels. But more importantly, this book was a huge let down for me because she fell short in almost every category that Sarah Dessen usually excels in. 

What I like about this book is how awkward Haven is. The character Haven to me, was very original because she’s a girl trying to figure out who she is, while being so tall that she feels uncomfortable with her height and how much everyone loved to talk about how tall she is. And I the sisterly-love near the end of the book because, really, family is forever. This book shows you that you really can’t change who you’re stuck with and you have to live with what you got. And at the end of the day, would you really want to change your family?

Flip By Martyn Bedford

3.5 I hate to say it, but if it wasn’t for the cover I wouldn’t have gave this book a second glance. 

One December night, 14-year-old Alex goes to  bed. He wakes up to  find himself in the wrong bedroom, in an unfamiliar house, in a different part of the country, and it’s the middle of June. Six months have disappeared overnight. The family at the breakfast table are total strangers.

And when he looks in the mirror, another boy’s face stares back at him.  A boy named FlipUnless Alex finds out what’s happened and how to get back to his own life,  he may be trapped forever inside a body that belongs to someone else.  

What I don’t like about this book is that it reminded me too much of ”freaky friday’ with Lindsay Lohan. Only it was with boys and they never met each other. I wish Martyn Bedford did something different with the boys’ personalities instead of making them complete opposites. Also, for me, the beginning was a bit bland, like there was a bit of something good but not enough for me to actually sit down and read through it. The characters were somewhat original but not as much as I would have liked them to be and I felt like, since it is in third person, that there should have been another point of view and not just Alex’s. 

What I like about this book is the cover. Am I the only one who thinks the guy on the cover is really cute? I hope not. But on the actual book, I like the ending because it wasn’t what I expected would happen. It was different and I got clammy fingers from freaking out. I also like that while Alex is in Flip’s body, he had a friend who he could always count on to help him figure out what to do in Flip’s body. It made it seem like Alex wasn’t as alone as he thought he was which is a good thing. Even though I found this book a but bland for most of it, I would recommend it to someone who is maybe looking for their guardian angel/older sibling in someone. 

Sinners Never Sleep By You Me At Six

4.6/5 You Me AT Six have done it again! I can’t believe they can make amazing music, be an actual band, be British, and not be all about their image!

You Me At Six  is a British rock band from Weybridge, Surrey. They formed in 2004 and have been playing music for over 6 years now. They have 3 albums-Take off your colours, hold me down, and sinners never sleep. They also have won many awards and have a lot of EPs out for sale. The band members are-Josh Franceschi  (lead vocals), Max Helyer (rhythm guitar, backing vocals), Chris Miller (lead guitar), Matt Barnes (bass guitar) ,Dan Flint (drums, percussion).

What I don’t like about this album is (even though I still love it) that all of the songs sort of sound…the same. Same beat, and same strings and chords with only different lyrics.

What I like about this is that they focused more on the music than on their image like other ‘bands’. I like how ‘When We Were Younger’ is smooth and soothing unlike the rest of the album and I can play it on repeat without even realizing it. The best part about this album in my opinion, is the lyrics. The lyrics are original, they speak the truth, and they are shockingly easy for their audience to relate to. I would also recommend this to music lovers who love british bands that are all about the music and and all about the different types of relationships that are out there. To me, this album is about growing up and dealing with the tough shit that sucks. And believing that if you ‘save someone’ that they can ‘save you too’.