Book Review: Twisted Fate by Norah Olson

Twisted Fate by Norah Olson

Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: January 20, 2015

Pages: 272 (Hardcover)

good good

When Alyson meets Graham Copeland, the new boy next door, she instantly feels like he’s a kindred spirit—shy and awkward like her, someone who has trouble making friends. It’s impossible to resist having a crush on him.

As usual, her sister, Sydney, sees things differently. In Sydney’s mind, Graham’s odd personality and secretive past scream psychopath, not sweetheart. Her gut is telling her to stay away from him, and to protect a love-struck Alyson from her own naïveté. But despite her instincts, Sydney is surprised to realize that a part of her is drawn to Graham, too.

And the more Sydney gets to know him, the more she realizes just how right—and wrong—she is about everything.

The only way to describe this book is with a saying my friend, James says about certain art–It’s a shitty painting with a really nice frame.

The idea for this book is really cool. It’s all mysterious and enticing, however the actual work, is all over the place. There’s insta-love and boring characters that literally have no lives except to hang out with Graham or talk about him. There are sisters that, honest to god, only compare each other and point out how different they are from one another. And on top of that, the writing is so unbelievably bad, half the time, I didn’t know if I was reading the book as things were happening or as the characters reflected back on the shit that just happened. I just didn’t know.

To make matters worse, this book tries so hard. It tries so hard to keep it interesting by changing up the POVs and adding random things here and there as well as adding a strange love triangle. However, despite the really nice frame (idea), a shitty painting will always be a shitty painting.

Bottom line, just skip this one. It’s not worth it.

1.5 Odd Clouds
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10 Book Lover Problems

 

Good morning! (or night. Or whenever you happen to read this.) I’ve been feeling kind pf slumped lately, mostly because I haven’t been posting on this blog (I’ll be better this year, I promise) and thought it would be great to share some of my book lover problems with you all. Do you suffer from any of these woes? If so, please let me know!

 

  1. Buying more books without reading/finishing the 75% on your shelves.

2. Running out of space so you shelve your books horizontally rather than vertical.

3. Taking too many books out of the library and finishing only 2 of them.

4. When you’re friends ‘pretend’ they understand your passion for books.

5. When you’re not prepared for the ending/climax of a book (#wingerbyandrewsmith)

 

6. When you read the same sentence 15 times because you’re tired/ just not getting it.7. When people say “just watch the movie.”

8. When you lose your place in the book.

9. When people just don’t stop talking to you.

10. When Goodreads is down.

Book Review: A Wicked Thing (A Wicked Thing#1) by Rhiannon Thomas

22535481A Wicked Thing (A Wicked Thing#1) by Rhiannon Thomas

Publisher: HarperTeen

Genre: Retelling and Young Adult

Release Date: February 24, 2015

Pages: 337 (Hardcover)

good good

One hundred years after falling asleep, Princess Aurora wakes up to the kiss of a handsome prince and a broken kingdom that has been dreaming of her return. All the books say that she should be living happily ever after. But as Aurora understands all too well, the truth is nothing like the fairy tale.

Her family is long dead. Her “true love” is a kind stranger. And her whole life has been planned out by political foes while she slept.

As Aurora struggles to make sense of her new world, she begins to fear that the curse has left its mark on her, a fiery and dangerous thing that might be as wicked as the witch who once ensnared her. With her wedding day drawing near, Aurora must make the ultimate decision on how to save her kingdom: marry the prince or run.

opinion

There’s a reason why not many authors write fairy tale retellings. It’s a hard thing to do. What’s even worse is when the fairy tale is the dullest one in the world. So no, I didn’t like reading A Wicked Thing and for readers with a low tolerance for boring shit, I don’t think they’ll like this one either.

It’s boring. From beginning to end, this book was my pal for lulling me to sleep. The writing is also really bad since it honest to God switches from how they would talk back in the day to how we talk ow. I had no patience for this and almost gave up on the book. Bad thing I didn’t because those uninteresting and underdeveloped characters from the beginning of story? They don’t get much better and Aurora is literally too annoying to give even a sliver of a fuck about.

Still, it has some good stuff. Not a lot, but some (thing). The witch part is well done, I felt the suspense and the creepiness. I was actually excited when the witch showed up and started making fun of everything. However, the witch doesn’t appear until the very end. That’s about it as far as stuff that I actually enjoyed goes.

A Wicked Thing was doomed from the start. Sleeping Beauty is a magical tale, sure, however, it’s quite dull and that makes it really hard to work with. I don’t recommend this unless you need some help getting to bed thanks to exams and stuff.

1.5 Odd Clouds
1.5 Odd Clouds

 

 

Book Review: The Jewel (The Lone City#1) by Amy Ewing

16068780The Jewel (The Lone City#1) by Amy Ewing

Publisher: HarperTeen

Genre: Dystopian and Young Adult

Release Date: September 2, 2014

Pages: 358 (Hardcover)

good good

The Jewel means wealth. The Jewel means beauty. The Jewel means royalty. But for girls like Violet, the Jewel means servitude. Not just any kind of servitude. Violet, born and raised in the Marsh, has been trained as a surrogate for the royalty—because in the Jewel the only thing more important than opulence is offspring.

Purchased at the surrogacy auction by the Duchess of the Lake and greeted with a slap to the face, Violet (now known only as #197) quickly learns of the brutal truths that lie beneath the Jewel’s glittering facade: the cruelty, backstabbing, and hidden violence that have become the royal way of life.

Violet must accept the ugly realities of her existence… and try to stay alive. But then a forbidden romance erupts between Violet and a handsome gentleman hired as a companion to the Duchess’s petulant niece. Though his presence makes life in the Jewel a bit brighter, the consequences of their illicit relationship will cost them both more than they bargained for.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, HarperTeen for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

The Jewel is like a fake diamond, really. At first glance, it’s breathtaking and stunning however, the longer you stare at it, the more cracks and falseness it has.

The world setting is really half-assed, nothing is well explained. Violet, the protagonist is so dull and so naive that I couldn’t care at all what happened to her. Moreover, the insta-love is so forced and awkward that I couldn’t help but laugh. First of all, since the characters are forgettable at best, nothing happens except the usual save the girl crap which only makes the whole story awkward and stiff.

However, like I said, upon first glance, The Jewel is beautiful and intriguing. The writing is stiff yet it fits the story (since everything about the book is stiff as fuck).

Overall, this book is not worth the time. It’s interesting at first but quickly goes south. Even the ending is typical and stupid. I don’t recommend this book at all because there are much better novels to read.

1.5 Odd Clouds
1.5 Odd Clouds

Book Review: The Murder Complex (The Murder Complex#1) by Lindsay Cummings

13576132The Murder Complex (The Murder Complex#1) by Lindsay Cummings

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Genre: Dystopian and Young Adult

Release Date: June 10, 2014

Pages: 398 (Hardcover)

good good

Meadow Woodson, a fifteen-year-old girl who has been trained by her father to fight, to kill, and to survive in any situation, lives with her family on a houseboat in Florida. The state is controlled by The Murder Complex, an organization that tracks the population with precision.

The plot starts to thicken when Meadow meets Zephyr James, who is—although he doesn’t know it—one of the MC’s programmed assassins. Is their meeting a coincidence? Destiny? Or part of a terrifying strategy? And will Zephyr keep Meadow from discovering the haunting truth about her family?

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Greenwillow Books for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

 

opinion

Honestly, what is this crap? Because from all the hype, I would have thought this book would be amazing and lively and shit. It’s not, not at all despite the non-stop action. I feel like The author thought that adding a shit ton of action and fighting would make up for the story being shitty but it really doesn’t and never will.

I got bored after the first chapter because of the writing which is so awkward and choppy as well as the characters which are ALL forgettable and as creative and original as a bowl of plain oatmeal. The romance sucks ass since it’s full-blown insta-love. Like, it’s the worst case I’ve ever read which is saying a lot if you check the shelf I have just for book full of insta-love. Moreover, for someone who’s been taught to be smart and survive, Meadow sure is stupid and naive. First, she risks death to save a stranger, and then she tries to negotiate with her killer just because she thinks he’s cute. I really don’t understand how she’s made it this far.

The chapters are really short. That’s always a plus.

The idea for The Murder Complex is really cool but that’s where the coolness ends. I’m so disappointed with this one. There was so much hype and I got really excited too, but don’t let that awesome cover and title fool you. This book is dull, stupid, and forgettable.

One Lonely Cloud
One Lonely Cloud

Book Review: Sweet Reckoning (Sweet#3) by Wendy Higgins

16007855Sweet Reckoning (Sweet#3) by Wendy Higgins

Publisher: HarperTeen

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: April 29, 2014

Pages: 379 (Paperback)

good good

It’s time.

Evil is running rampant and sweet Anna Whitt is its target. Nobody knows when or how the Dukes will strike, but Anna and her Nephilim allies will do anything necessary to rid the earth of the demons and their oppressive ways.

The stakes are higher than ever, and Anna is determined that the love she feels will be her strength, not a liability. But trying to protect the ones she loves while running for her life and battling demonic forces proves to be perilous—especially as faces are changing and trust is fleeting. When the Duke of Lust sends Anna’s great love, Kaidan Rowe, to work against her, Anna must decide how much she’s prepared to risk.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, HarperTeen for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

All Anna does is cry.

description

Sweet Reckoning is so boring and I couldn’t help but be upset by it. Kaidan, the boy that I swooned over for some time turns into a complete lovesick loser in this book and I understand that he’s in love but come on! Keep it interesting! This is the last book in this trilogy and I couldn’t help but feel disappointed by it.

I also had a problem with the length of the book. I’m being honest when I say that it could have been cut down by AT LEAST 200 pages. Because those first two hundred pages are completely pointless. What makes me even more angry though is how it all went down in the end. I mean, seriously? It’s boring and predictable. Ugh.

Nonetheless, I liked the writing and for the most part, most of the characters. I think that’s it though.

Disappointed is an understatement for what I felt for this book. Sweet Reckoning was supposed to be the big finale, with a shit ton and stuff happening left and right. However, it’s all just sitting around being all cute and whatever. This is still a good series, just lower your expectations when you get to this book.

2.5 Mess Up Clouds
2.5 Mess Up Clouds

Book Review: Prisoner of Night and Fog (Prisoner of Night and Fog#1) by Anne Blankman

17668473Prisoner of Night and Fog (Prisoner of Night and Fog#1) by Anne Blankman

Publisher: Balzer + Bray

Genre: Historical Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: April 22, 2014

Pages: 401 (Hardcover)

good good

In 1930s Munich, danger lurks behind dark corners, and secrets are buried deep within the city. But Gretchen Müller, who grew up in the National Socialist Party under the wing of her “uncle” Dolf, has been shielded from that side of society ever since her father traded his life for Dolf’s, and Gretchen is his favorite, his pet.

Uncle Dolf is none other than Adolf Hitler. And Gretchen follows his every command.

Until she meets a fearless and handsome young Jewish reporter named Daniel Cohen. Gretchen should despise Daniel, yet she can’t stop herself from listening to his story: that her father, the adored Nazi martyr, was actually murdered by an unknown comrade. She also can’t help the fierce attraction brewing between them, despite everything she’s been taught to believe about Jews.

As Gretchen investigates the very people she’s always considered friends, she must decide where her loyalties lie. Will she choose the safety of her former life as a Nazi darling, or will she dare to dig up the truth—even if it could get her and Daniel killed?

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Balzer + Bray for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

It’s extremely important for everyone to understand our pasts so that we can hopefully never repeat them again or at least to the same extent. Prisoner of Night and Fog is a great novel in the sense that it’s a retelling of most of World War two and the build-up towards it. This series is pretty much going to be the WW2 part of any history class (hopefully) and I actually enjoyed it a lot. Not only did I like the fictional, but the non fictional ones as well. I’ve never been a fan of historical fiction and much less of anything non fiction yet I couldn’t put this book down.

Although it takes a lot of work working with non fictional characters, Blankman does a great job. However,  in the beginning with the Jew that her brother wanted to beat up. The whole incident felt really forced to get the story going. Another thing that felt forced is the second half of the novel where the romance is so clichéd and contrived that I wanted to puke. Gretchen went from this badass girl who was uncertain about her family and willing to get answers to this girl who needed her ‘man’ almost all the time. The mystery aspect of the novel is actually really boring, there’s a lot of planning and searching but not enough of anything else until the end of the story.

Prisoner of Night and Fog is still an excellent book. The relationship between Gretchen and Hitler is very well done and shows the decline of their trust in one another. Moreover, Blankman did a lot of research for the story and it really shows. Small details that most people overlook play big roles in the not only this story but the actual war. Despite disliking Gretchen during the last quarter of the story, I really liked her. She was strong and brave, using her clever wit to get past the people who stand in her way.

Overall, I do recommend this book to everyone. It’s historical fiction yes, but it’s also about one of the worst cases of genocide the world has ever seen. It’s not all that gory but it’s intense and I have a lot of faith in this author to get really in-depth with the whole series.

3.5 Interesting Clouds
3.5 Interesting Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.