Book Review: This Savage Song ( Monsters of Verity#1) by Victoria Schwab

26074170This Savage Song ( Monsters of Verity#1) by Victoria Schwab 

Publisher: GreenWillow Books

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: June 7, 2016

Pages: 464 (Hardcover)

good good

There’s no such thing as safe in a city at war, a city overrun with monsters. In this dark urban fantasy from author Victoria Schwab, a young woman and a young man must choose whether to become heroes or villains—and friends or enemies—with the future of their home at stake. The first of two books.

Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, GreenWillow Books for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

I’ve read Schwab’s other story, The Archived  and really enjoyed it so I was super pumped to read This Savage Song. But, like, no. So monotone, so unemotional, and just…sad. Pretty much, all I was thinking while reading this was:

 

Nothing matters in the book. And by this, I mean I could not have cared less if the whole city got eaten by monsters. The characters are not well-developed, are extremely flat, and annoying. An example would have to be August himself as he’s supposed to be watching Kate, understanding her tactics, and reporting everything back to his dad yet he doesn’t (or rarely ever does) report a damn thing. He just waits for her to show up. Again,

On top of this, the relationship between Kate and August is so fucking contrived which is pointless Since there is nothing to care about here.

But, I did like the setting. Schwab seems to spend ample amounts of time on world building, which is great because the setting is the best. Monsters! Crawling everywhere! No one is safe. I could completely believe it, feel the atmosphere of the things that go bump in the night, unfortunately, it quickly died because of everything else. Moreover, the only character I actually enjoyed was Ilsa because she is so strange yet cool and AHHH!! Picturing the stars all over her body is just so beautiful and perfect. But then again, maybe I don’t actually like the character, maybe I like the idea of this character. Either way, I’m giving Schwab points for it.

This Savage Song is flat-out a ‘meh’ book. The characters are shit with Leo leading the pack. When he did anything, I took it all in without hesitation or emotion. Moreover, because of this, the plot twists are shit, the writing is okay, and the world is excellent. Although I do recommend this book, I also recommend to go into it with an open mind as you will most likely be let down otherwise.

3 Mediocre Clouds
3 Mediocre Clouds
Advertisements

Book review: No Parking at the End Times by Bryan Bliss

22403036No Parking at the End Times by Bryan Bliss

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Genre:Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: February 24, 2015

Pages: 272 (Hardcover)

good good

Abigail’s parents have made mistake after mistake, and now they’ve lost everything. She’s left to decide: Does she still believe in them? Or is it time to believe in herself? Fans of Sara Zarr, David Levithan, and Rainbow Rowell will connect with this moving debut.

Abigail doesn’t know how her dad found Brother John. Maybe it was the billboards. Or the radio. What she does know is that he never should have made that first donation. Or the next, or the next. Her parents shouldn’t have sold their house. Or packed Abigail and her twin brother, Aaron, into their old van to drive across the country to San Francisco, to be there with Brother John for the “end of the world.” Because of course the end didn’t come. And now they’re living in their van. And Aaron’s disappearing to who-knows-where every night. Their family is falling apart. All Abigail wants is to hold them together, to get them back to the place where things were right. But maybe it’s too big a task for one teenage girl.

opinionLook, let’s just get straight to the point. Was I made by the end of this book? Not quite. Did I still have a lot of questions, like how some loser conned more than two dozen people into giving him pretty much everything? Fuck yes. But more than that, I was disappointed. I felt so underwhelmed by every aspect of No Parking at the End Times, even during the parts where there should have been a lot of religious insight,fuck, any kind of insight, I got nothing. You’re better off skimming a pamphlet on the ‘New World’ rather than read this book.

Why? Because nothing happens. And when something does happen, it’s 77% into the book, where no shits are given anymore. Don’t get me wrong, I love a good build-up, leaving room for nothing but suspense however this is ridiculous. And when you pair a boring book and awkward writing that’s full of unnecessary words, well, the outcome isn’t pretty. Moreover, for a novel that has so much on the Now, there’s almost nothing on the Then part. The book is mostly surrounded on the decisions that Abigail’s father has made and still making, how his mistakes have caused the family to lose greatly. So when I was reading and found close to nothing, honest to God, nothing on what made him switch gears and decide to listen to Brother John, I couldn’t help but scream. Adding onto this, the characters aren’t fleshed out. Abigail, I could understand for the most part because I could relate to her but only to a point. Halfway done, I stopped caring about her as well as the other characters. They just don’t stick out, especially Brother John, who is supposed to be this magnificent man sent down from God. Obviously he’s not but I did not see the appeal of him. He always gave generic answers, didn’t read any fucking verses from the Bible despite always having it on hand, and all around, didn’t even act like he was really into it. As a con artist you have to at least fake to have your heart in it, this guy gave no fucks. Now, does that sound like a man two relatively responsible adults with two children would give everything to? It doesn’t to me, I still don’t understand where Bliss was going with him.

Nonetheless, there are some mediocre things that I didn’t mind. One of them being the Before chapters albeit short and mostly pointless because they tell only snippets of what happened, of how they got to California rather than giving the whole picture.

No Parking at the End Times might have been great since most books about the Rapture don’t really go into after the ‘event’, only about two weeks later. What made me even more disappointed is the fact that the beginning is so good. Like, guys, it’s so good. It’s intense, mysterious, and exciting. I was giddy with pleasure (that died like two or three chapters later). Would I recommend this novel? No, like I said before, I got more information from a pamphlet, hell, even the damn internet than I did on the actual Rapture, or on anything religious. This should tell you something about how badly this book is written when I have to complain multiple times about the religion aspect of it. And I don’t even like religion.

1.5 Odd Clouds
1.5 Odd Clouds

Book Review: The Murder Complex (The Murder Complex#1) by Lindsay Cummings

13576132The Murder Complex (The Murder Complex#1) by Lindsay Cummings

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Genre: Dystopian and Young Adult

Release Date: June 10, 2014

Pages: 398 (Hardcover)

good good

Meadow Woodson, a fifteen-year-old girl who has been trained by her father to fight, to kill, and to survive in any situation, lives with her family on a houseboat in Florida. The state is controlled by The Murder Complex, an organization that tracks the population with precision.

The plot starts to thicken when Meadow meets Zephyr James, who is—although he doesn’t know it—one of the MC’s programmed assassins. Is their meeting a coincidence? Destiny? Or part of a terrifying strategy? And will Zephyr keep Meadow from discovering the haunting truth about her family?

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Greenwillow Books for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

 

opinion

Honestly, what is this crap? Because from all the hype, I would have thought this book would be amazing and lively and shit. It’s not, not at all despite the non-stop action. I feel like The author thought that adding a shit ton of action and fighting would make up for the story being shitty but it really doesn’t and never will.

I got bored after the first chapter because of the writing which is so awkward and choppy as well as the characters which are ALL forgettable and as creative and original as a bowl of plain oatmeal. The romance sucks ass since it’s full-blown insta-love. Like, it’s the worst case I’ve ever read which is saying a lot if you check the shelf I have just for book full of insta-love. Moreover, for someone who’s been taught to be smart and survive, Meadow sure is stupid and naive. First, she risks death to save a stranger, and then she tries to negotiate with her killer just because she thinks he’s cute. I really don’t understand how she’s made it this far.

The chapters are really short. That’s always a plus.

The idea for The Murder Complex is really cool but that’s where the coolness ends. I’m so disappointed with this one. There was so much hype and I got really excited too, but don’t let that awesome cover and title fool you. This book is dull, stupid, and forgettable.

One Lonely Cloud
One Lonely Cloud

Book Review: Meridian (Arclight#2) by Josin L. McQuein

17798031Meridian (Arclight#2) by Josin L. McQuein

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Genre: Dystopian and Young Adult

Release Date: May 27, 2014

Pages: 458 (Hardcover)

good good

Marina thought that she had solved all of the Arclight’s mysteries. She had found her own history—that she was one of the Fade, that she never should have been human. She knows that the Fade who surround the Arclight don’t want to be the humans’ enemies at all. She knows that the leader of those inside the Arc, Honoria Whit, never told the whole truth. But there is so much more that Marina is just discovering. There are more survivors out there. Only Marina—and her friends, all of whom have connections to the Fade they’d never known about—can lead her people to them. But there are also darker dangers, things that even the Fade fear. And Marina slowly realizes she may never have been “cured,” after all. The sequel to Arclight, Meridian is an intense, action-packed page-turner about the lines we draw between right and wrong, light and dark . . . and the way nothing is ever that black and white.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Greenwillow Books for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinionAll I can truly say about this book, is: I really hope that there will be another book and I cannot wait for it. It seems weird that I would even enjoy this series as much as I have considering all of the clichés and annoyances it has. But I just can’t get enough of it and it’s mostly because of one of the love interests. He’s actually perfect and amazing and I love him so, so, so much. But as a whole, I was pretty disappointed with this book and I’m hoping that the next one (hopefully) is done a lot better and leaves all the predictability alone.

I think that McQuein’s biggest struggle with this series apart from how predictable it is, are the character and how lacking most of them seem to be. After I finished reading Arclight, I was expecting the characters to really stand out to me since the awkwardness of being presented a new world was just about over. Yet, they stayed the same, forgettable and not at all moving in any way. The relationship between Marina and Tobin is strained. Whenever they’re together, I felt like McQuein wanted to remind readers that Rue isn’t the only guy in Marina’s life and that she cares about Tobin also (insert extremely awkward and misplaced kissing here). Another horribly done thing in the book is the dual perspective. Some authors can do it, but most can’t and although I could distinctively tell which character’s perspective I was reading from, I didn’t like how useless his voice is. I got close to no information on him or really got inside of his head.

Beside all of that, I did like Meridian. I liked the writing, same as the first one and I love how well McQuein’s attention to detail is. She soothingly puts in a ton of description into things especially the trip to the Cube which I could easily picture in my head. Like I mentioned before, Rue plays a huge part in my rating for this book. His character excels where other do not. I was rooting for him, from cover to cover and I looked forward to his sarcastic-but-not-really manner. His complete devotion to include everyone and respects decisions yet leaves no one behind pulled at my heart and this is why he’s awesome.

Meridian is not as good as it could be but I still liked some things about it. I’m giving it a pretty high rating because of Rue and how much I enjoyed him. It’s like how some people feel about The Real Housewives it’s so dumb but you just love it despite its flaws.

Still, I recommend this book to anyone who has read the first. And if you haven’t read this series yet, but trust my judgement and the fact that I usually don’t take to any love interest, read this series! Rue is too awesome and I love him.

2.5 Mess Up Clouds
2.5 Mess Up Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty by Christine Hepperman

20483085Poisoned Apples: Poems for You, My Pretty by Christine Hepperman

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Genre:Fantasy and Poetry

Release Date: September 23, 2014

Pages: 128 (Hardcover)

good good

Every little girl goes through her princess phase, whether she wants to be Snow White or Cinderella, Belle or Ariel. But then we grow up. And life is not a fairy tale.

Cruelties come not just from wicked stepmothers, but also from ourselves. There are expectations, pressures, judgment, and criticism. Self-doubt and self-confidence. But there are also friends, and sisters, and a whole hell of a lot of power there for the taking. In fifty poems, Christine Heppermann confronts society head on. Using fairy tale characters and tropes, Poisoned Apples explores how girls are taught to think about themselves, their bodies, and their friends. The poems range from contemporary retellings to first-person accounts set within the original tales, and from deadly funny to deadly serious. Complemented throughout with black-and-white photographs from up-and-coming artists, this is a stunning and sophisticated book to be treasured, shared, and paged through again and again.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Greenwillow Books for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinionPoems are awesome and I love seeing them more and more in the novels I read. Poisoned Apples has a story that will connect with most people. I really liked some of the poems, especially the ones that are modernized retellings of some very classic tales like Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and The Beauty and the Beast. Overall, a fun, very short read that takes no time to finish at all.

Although for the most part, I liked this book, I didn’t like how random it is between the good parts. Some of them are very short and about nothing more than, like, Abercrombie or something. Adding onto that, in the middle, the book starts to dwindle down and I found myself skimming through some of them to get to the better, retellings parts.

Poisoned Apples is a short read. I breezed right through it in less than an hour. From the stories that I did enjoy, I liked them also because of their freakiness and the art work that goes with them. The hands acting like trees and water and whatnot is very cool and caught my attention.

I understand that some people believe that life is a fairy tale but I loved how Hepperman decided to make these retellings as realistic as possible and adding in problems that many people face today. I recommend this one to anyone looking to read either some short poems or fairy tales.

3 Clouds
3 Clouds

Book Review: Talker 25 (Talker 25#1) by Joshua McCune

17339959Talker 25 by Joshua McCune

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: April 22, 2014

Pages: 432 (Hardcover)

good good

 

It’s a high school prank gone horribly wrong-sneaking onto the rez to pose next to a sleeping dragon-and now senior Melissa Callahan has become an unsuspecting pawn in a war between Man and Monster, between family and friends and the dragons she has despised her whole life. Chilling, epic, and wholly original, this debut novel imagines a North America where dragons are kept on reservations, where strict blackout rules are obeyed no matter the cost, where the highly weaponized military operates in chilling secret, and where a gruesome television show called Kissing Dragons unites the population. Joshua McCune’s debut novel offers action, adventure, fantasy, and a reimagining of popular dragon lore.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Greenwillow Books for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

 

Close your eyes (do it.) Now, imagine a mythical creature that terrifies you, it’s okay you don’t have to tell anyone what it is. Got it? Good. Keep that creature in your head, think of how scary and fucked up it is, now turn it into a fluffy adorable version of itself. Disney-fy the shit out of it if you have to. That, is what you get in Talker 25. You get these badass creatures lying around sleeping and then getting ridden like some kind of pet. That’s pretty much it and I’m sad to say it never gets any better.

Melissa, Mel, Callahan, whatever you want to call our protagonist is an idiot who thinks she’s brave and has a lot of spunk. She doesn’t. She’s just stupid and naive. Half the time, she doesn’t make sense. She has spent the better of three years fearing and hating dragons because of what they did to her mother, yet at the first chance she gets, she rides them. Why? Did I miss something in this sudden change? It makes no sense, if something killed my mother I would not under ant circumstance befriend it/them. On top of that, nothing is well explained. There are three types of dragons yet all I really understand about the green ones are that they’re the most military like. The other two are lost causes to me nor do I care about them. The romance is also very pathetic and annoying since we have the protagonist be a snotty brat one second and then worried about the way she looks the next when a complete stranger who was following her knows her name. It’s so forced and I really didn’t see what the love interest saw in her.  To make matters worse is the military, the US can make these insane weapons yet can’t keep some teenagers out of a dangerous compound? The military in the book is a complete joke, maybe worse than the protagonist and the romance combined. They do nothing, think of nothing, and just allow these teenagers into the compound with fucking Dragons and don’t even send these kids to jail because, “they were just having some fun.” What the hell is this book? I believe in having fun and taking chances but this is a damn dragon compound. These kids could get killed and it seems that the military would still sit on their asses. *Shakes head*.

What did I like about this big joke of a novel? Believe it or not, despite the super cheesy summary, I was expecting something exciting and I liked what I thought was the concept of this story. Turns out that was a joke too.

Talker 25 is just bad, from every angle. From the first page, I was confused. Dragons aren’t some kind of side plot, they are the plot or at least should be, so I would like to know about them before the 30% mark other than they’re red or blue or green and the red and blue can mate. What the fuck am I supposed to do with that information? It also doesn’t help that no one can make up their fucking minds on what the fuck to call our protagonist and I’m aware that this is silly but it’s not. One sentence her friends are calling her Callahan, and then the next they’re calling her Mel. Why? No reason, it’s not to show anger or anything. I don’t recommend this one to anyone because it is absolutely horrid and stupid and bad and you will either get really angry or really sleepy reading it.

1 Lonely Cloud
1 Lonely Cloud

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book review: Arclight (Arclight#1) by Josin L. McQuein

12138494

Arclight (Arclight#1) by Josin L. McQuein

Publisher:  Greenwillow Books

Genre: Dystopian and Young Adult

Release Date: April 23, 2013

Pages: 400 (Hardcover)

good good

The Arclight is the last defense. The Fade can’t get in. Outside the Arclight’s border of high-powered beams is the Dark. And between the Light and the Dark is the Grey, a narrow, barren no-man’s-land. That’s where the rescue team finds Marina, a lone teenage girl with no memory of the horrors she faced or the family she lost. Marina is the only person who has ever survived an encounter with the Fade. She’s the first hope humanity has had in generations, but she could also be the catalyst for their final destruction. Because the Fade will stop at nothing to get her back. Marina knows it. Tobin, who’s determined to take his revenge on the Fade, knows it. Anne-Marie, who just wishes it were all over, knows it.

When one of the Fade infiltrates the Arclight and Marina recognizes it, she will begin to unlock secrets she didn’t even know she had. Who will Marina become? Who can she never be again?

opinion

All pain is bad for my Cherish.

Okay, I know that quote is cheesy but holy crap! I fell for Rue so hard! He’s really funny with the way he tries to speak and murder some of the people he hates. It’s just too hilarious. Marina is an okay protagonist because she’s quite easy to understand and to know what she’s about to do before she does. The writing style is okay, in the beginning, it’s very awkward and very stretched out as if Josin L. McQuein was trying to put as many words in to get the point across as possible. But after a while, with everything that`s going on, I didn’t notice the awkwardness too much.

This book is barely a mediocre kind of read for me. It’s glaringly predictable even from the very beginning (page 6 when I realized what would happen between Marina and one of her love interests). Even though I love Rue, most of the characters are lacking in almost every department.  Moreover, they have close to no emotion that sticks out which makes it hard for readers to feel sympathy when it is supposed to be given. Instead, they feel like cardboard–boring and lifeless. The romance is very stiff, and disorganized with no build-up whatsoever especially with the love triangle itself. With Rue, the romance is there because of a strong foundation. But with the other guy, it’s flimsy at best. It seems like McQuein literally picked it (the romance) out of the air and shoved it in here just for the hell of it.

Now, onto the stuff I liked about Arclight. Which mostly was: Rue. Oh, Rue, I love you! He snatched my heart with such unexpected warmth and happiness that even his flaws didn’t bother me. His need to protect Cherish and love her only made me love him more. Some parts of the Colonies and how they interact with each other, becoming a whole and connecting everyone is creative. Instead of using words to express their emotions and the others around them, they use images and emotions and are never alone. Even with it being unoriginal, I liked this part about the book a lot.

Arclight  is a fun story, even with it being unoriginal. With a fun ending that’s open enough to leave room for more improvement for the next installment, I’m excited to read what happens next with Rue (don’t really care about Cherish though).  I recommend this to anyone new or newish to the genre of Dystopia/Dystopian because it’s too predictable to fully enjoy the novel otherwise.

3 Clouds
3 Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.