Book Review: Clean by Amy Reed

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Clean by Amy Reed

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: May 8, 2012

Pages: 304 (Paperback)

good good

You’re probably wondering how I ended up here. I’m still wondering the same thing.

Olivia, Kelly, Christopher, Jason, and Eva have one thing in common: They’re addicts. Addicts who have hit rock bottom and been stuck together in rehab to face their problems, face sobriety, and face themselves. None of them wants to be there. None of them wants to confront the truths about their pasts. And they certainly don’t want to share their darkest secrets and most desperate fears with a room of strangers. But they’ll all have to deal with themselves—and one another—if they want to learn how to live. Because when you get that high, there’s nowhere to go but down, down, down.

opinion

 

Sometimes, shit happens and depending on it, it can really mess a person up. I love how Amy Reed has shown this with all of her characters. They all have their different personalities, families, and preferred drugs. Their lives are intriguing and exciting yet sad and vulnerable at the same time. The road to recovery is one of the hardest ones there is because it has to do with self recover and self discovery.

Jason is by far my favourite character in this novel so of course I wanted a lot more from him than what I received. And this is partly because actual chapters are only told from Christopher and Kelly’s perspective. I love poetic writing but I have ADD so the constant writing for Eva lost my attention more often than not. I appreciate the creative style and how her story is told from a little girl’s perspective rather than in first person but sometimes a little bit of simplicity goes a long way for me.

Clean has short chapters between the actual chapters. These sort chapters are mostly with the group and I love these chapters because they’re simple and realistic, like an actual group of teenagers speaking their minds of a certain thing and explaining their thoughts. The characters are all realistic with their problems, I found it easy to relate to them all in some way because I’ve been or know how it feels to be in their situations.

Amy Reed is an author that I feel like understands the amount of crap that teenagers face in life. I recommend this novel to everyone because it’s not just a novel for teens but for adults as well and I think everyone can learn a few things from it.

3.5 Dreamy Clouds
3.5 Dreamy Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

3.5/5-If only this book was as good as the summary, it would have been a better read. The cover really drew me in because of her glowing blue eyes and the beautiful leaves that draped over her. It’s so beautiful.

(Summary from Goodreads )

Sabrina, an artist, is diagnosed with schizophrenia, and her parents check her into the Wellness Center. There she meets Alec, who is convinced it’s the world that’s crazy, not the two of them. They are meant to be together; they are special. But when Alec starts to convince Sabrina that her treatment will wipe out everything that makes her creative, she worries that she’ll lose hold of her dreams and herself. Should she listen to her doctor? her decision may have fatal consequences.

(My Opinion)

Told from Sabrina’s perspective, a story about loss, love, and freedom. James Brian could have done a much better job with this. The idea behind this story isn’t very original and it showed because there wasn’t anything special about the book. The characters were a bit confusing and weren’t clear about the way they were supposed to be presented. Sabrina was very confusing since she saw things differently than others which made it hard for me to understand some of the things.

What annoyed me the most was the writing style because it was smooth and easy to read, instead it was choppy, confusing, and annoying. Brian James didn’t use quotation marks for when a character was speaking which I thought wouldn’t make any difference to me, but it did because when I thought a character was talking, they really weren’t. Life Is But A Dream is not a book full of action and intense moments you’d think would be in a story about escaping a mental hospital. Not at all. I was really let down that there wasn’t any chase scene, fights, and adults looking like fools. I was expecting at least something, even when they were trying to escape the hospital, it let me down. The relationship between Sabrina and Alec is a bit boring and typical, I wished Alec was different and didn’t stand up for Sabrina as much, then it would have been different.

Even though I didn’t like the constant details of everything Sabrina saw, I liked having a vague picture of it. When she explained about the clouds and the static that was controlling people, I thought that was cool because in a way, its true. People are being brainwashed to believe in things that are broken instead of opening their eyes and seeing how awful the world is. I also liked the ending because Sabrina was forced to look inside herself and a very hard decision about whether she actually needed help or if the doctors were playing  a cruel joke on her to keep her to stay.

I would recommend this book to people who don’t really care about action in books, but more about the message. The message in this book is an easy one but with a different way of saying it since Sabrina is a bit different from other people.

Life Is But A Dream By Brian James

3.5/5-If only this book was as good as the summary, it would have been a better read. The cover really drew me in because of her glowing blue eyes and the beautiful leaves that draped over her. It’s so beautiful.

(Summary from Goodreads )

Sabrina, an artist, is diagnosed with schizophrenia, and her parents check her into the Wellness Center. There she meets Alec, who is convinced it’s the world that’s crazy, not the two of them. They are meant to be together; they are special. But when Alec starts to convince Sabrina that her treatment will wipe out everything that makes her creative, she worries that she’ll lose hold of her dreams and herself. Should she listen to her doctor? her decision may have fatal consequences.

(My Opinion)

Told from Sabrina’s perspective, a story about loss, love, and freedom. James Brian could have done a much better job with this. The idea behind this story isn’t very original and it showed because there wasn’t anything special about the book. The characters were a bit confusing and weren’t clear about the way they were supposed to be presented. Sabrina was very confusing since she saw things differently than others which made it hard for me to understand some of the things.

What annoyed me the most was the writing style because it was smooth and easy to read, instead it was choppy, confusing, and annoying. Brian James didn’t use quotation marks for when a character was speaking which I thought wouldn’t make any difference to me, but it did because when I thought a character was talking, they really weren’t. Life Is But A Dream is not a book full of action and intense moments you’d think would be in a story about escaping a mental hospital. Not at all. I was really let down that there wasn’t any chase scene, fights, and adults looking like fools. I was expecting at least something, even when they were trying to escape the hospital, it let me down. The relationship between Sabrina and Alec is a bit boring and typical, I wished Alec was different and didn’t stand up for Sabrina as much, then it would have been different.

Even though I didn’t like the constant details of everything Sabrina saw, I liked having a vague picture of it. When she explained about the clouds and the static that was controlling people, I thought that was cool because in a way, its true. People are being brainwashed to believe in things that are broken instead of opening their eyes and seeing how awful the world is. I also liked the ending because Sabrina was forced to look inside herself and a very hard decision about whether she actually needed help or if the doctors were playing  a cruel joke on her to keep her to stay.

I would recommend this book to people who don’t really care about action in books, but more about the message. The message in this book is an easy one but with a different way of saying it since Sabrina is a bit different from other people.