Book Review: Buzz Kill by Beth Fantaskey

18118614 (1)Buzz Kill by Beth Fantaskey

Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: May 6, 2014

Pages: 368 (Hardcover)

good good

Putting the dead in deadline
To Bee or not to Bee? When the widely disliked Honeywell Stingers football coach is found murdered, 17-year-old Millie is determined to investigate. She is chasing a lead for the school newspaper – and looking to clear her father, the assistant coach, and prime suspect.

Millie’s partner is gorgeous, smart-and keeping secrets
Millie joins forces with her mysterious classmate Chase who seems to want to help her even while covering up secrets of his own.

She’s starting to get a reputation…without any of the benefits.
Drama-and bodies-pile up around Millie and she chases clues, snuggles Baxter the so-ugly-he’s-adorable bassett hound, and storms out of the world’s most awkward school dance/memorial mash-up. At least she gets to eat a lot of pie.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, HMH Books for Young Readers for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

When I was younger, I hated reading. I really did, my mother forced me to stand in front of her and read to her and it felt like a complete hassle to do it. Yet, this one series of books (Cam Jensen and the so and so) made all that bearable and although wasn’t the book that made me start loving books, it did help. Cam Jensen will forever be one of my favourite protagonists and I see a lot of similarities between that series and this book. There’s a mystery, there’s the main character with the photographic memory who is also a redhead, the cute quiet boy, as well as other thing. Although these books are similar there’s one thing that makes Cam Jensen stand out–her badass attitude and the way she never fucking whines about anything.

Buzz Kill should not be targeted towards young adults, it should be targeted towards middle schoolers because that’s the only time that realism is not needed in stories. The characters are all flat and boring. They’re cutouts of traits that are popular in YA novels and thrown in to make an unbelievable cast. I hated how they all are supposed to be adults or almost adults yet they act like they’re in elementary school with their petty fights over who boys and assignments. Hell, no one even swears! You cannot tell me that teenagers don’t swear because that is a lie! I also had a problem with the romance is forced and typical (confused girl is the only one who understands the beautiful broken boy) and not very realistic. Aside from Millie’s stupidity, there’s no legit reason for why she wants to find the killer and her photographic memory didn’t add anything to the story.

I don’t mind thrillers, I just have a hard time believing them especially when they involve high school students. This book is made out to be quirky and corny but I just found it annoying and stupid. I only recommend this if you enjoy No One Else Can Have You by Kathleen Hale and enjoyed it a lot because this one is a lot like that. Under no other circumstance should this book be read because you will most likely fall asleep.

1 Lonely Cloud
1 Lonely Cloud

Book Review: Unaccompanied Minor by Hollis Gillespie

17849185Unaccompanied Minor by Hollis Gillespie

Publisher: Merit Press

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: January 1, 2014

Pages: 256 (Hardcover)

good good

Fourteen-year-old April May Manning spent her life on airplanes with her flight attendant parents. When her father dies in a crash, April’s mom marries a pilot who turns out to be an abusive jerk, and gets Mom confined to a psychiatric hospital. So April takes off, literally, living on airplanes, using her mother’s flight benefits, relying on the flight crews who know she’s been shuttling between divorcing parents for a year. Then, there’s a hijacking, but why is April’s “dad” on board? April flees to the cargo hold with another unaccompanied minor she’s met before, and they fight to thwart the hijackers, faking a fire, making weapons from things they find in luggage. At last, locked in the cockpit with a wounded police officer, the boy, and his service dog, April tries to remember everything her parents said to do in a crisis above the clouds. But she knows it won’t be enough.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Merit Press for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

This book is just annoying. April Manning is a Nancy Drew like character, only worse because she’s boring and unrealistic. 

You know those kids that you have to babysit, the ones that just never shut up even if they’re right about something? That kid is April, and for the life of me, I could not stop picturing her as a seven year old tugging on my arm. I get it, you have a plan, and you’re smart. Shut up. Like I said above, there is a lot of forced humour. And I’m not over exaggerating. There are a few deaths, and they’re played off as jokes. The bad guys (if they can even be called that) are complete jokes that barely ever make sense. There’s quite a bit of info-dumping, and the story is very disorganized.

Airports are such a fun place, and the idea and the setting for it was what saved Unaccompanied Minor for me. They are very loud and chaotic which is why April got by so easily unnoticed. There are a few surprises though, so that was fun.

Overall, unless you’re looking for a Nancy Drew/Scooby Doo and the Gang kind of story then skip this. I felt as if I were reading about a crazy mystery that had too much forced humour and too little seriousness.

2 Clouds
2 Clouds