Between The Lines By Jodi Picoult And Samantha Van Leer

3.2/5-I was expecting a lot more from this book. Simon and Schuster, Jodi Picoult and her daughter, Samantha Van Leer got everyone excited for this book. I mean, a fairy tale where the characters literally come to life-who wouldn’t want to read this book? Sadly, it fell very short from what I expected it to be.

 

(Summary from Goodreads)

Delilah is a bit of a loner who prefers spending her time in the school library with her head in a book—one book in particular. Between the Lines may be a fairy tale, but it feels real. Prince Oliver is brave, adventurous, and loving. He really speaks to Delilah.

 

And then one day Oliver actually speaks to her. Turns out, Oliver is more than a one-dimensional storybook prince. He’s a restless teen who feels trapped by his literary existence and hates that his entire life is predetermined. He’s sure there’s more for him out there in the real world, and Delilah might just be his key to freedom.

 

Delilah and Oliver work together to attempt to get Oliver out of his book, a challenging task that forces them to examine their perceptions of fate, the world, and their places in it. And as their attraction to each other grows along the way, a romance blossoms that is anything but a fairy tale.

(My Opinion)

Between The Lines was written the perspective of Oliver, Delilah, and the Narrator. The characters’ were typical and felt like they were just words on paper, nothing they did made them come alive to me. I loved the idea for this story because it’s different and I was instantly interested in what it was about and about Oliver’s fate. The writing for this story annoyed me for some reason and there were a few words used in the wrong sense.

 

Oh man, where do I start? Okay how about the fact that the characters’ were so typical and boring that I almost stopped reading. Yup, this book had so much potential with this amazing idea but the characters didn’t pull throw nor did the writing style. This book didn’t have enough dialogue for me which is something that I didn’t like at all. There was too much explanation in the first few chapters. Delilah was a very typical character that was a loner, had problems with other people (which is fine) and stuff but there wasn’t anything interesting about her other than she could talk to Oliver. I wished the authors made her more mesmerizing and original. There were a lot of parts in the story where I was shaking my head because there were parts that seemed either rushed or disorganized and didn’t fit well with the story. Jules didn’t feel any real to me either and the fight between her and Delilah wasn’t good or entertaining. I was actually yawning while reading it.

 

Like I said before, the idea for this story is amazing and I loved it. Three stories wrapped up into one bigger story is great and usually exciting. I liked that the authors put the name of which character/narrator we were reading at the top of the page. My favourite parts of this book were the obstacles and challenges that Oliver and Delilah had to go through to find the right way to get Oliver out of the book.

 

I don’t think this book is a good read for anyone over the age of fourteen because you can bluntly tell that it won’t entertain anyone over that age. If you are a ‘grammar cop’ this book isn’t for you at all. This book might be enjoyable for young teens who like reading three stories in one book because I liked that.

Between The Lines By Jodi Picoult And Samantha Van Leer

2/5-I was expecting a lot more from this book. Simon and Schuster, Jodi Picoult and her daughter, Samantha Van Leer got everyone excited for this book. I mean, a fairy tale where the characters literally come to life-who wouldn’t want to read this book? Sadly, it fell very short from what I expected it to be.

(Summary from Goodreads)

Delilah is a bit of a loner who prefers spending her time in the school library with her head in a book—one book in particular. Between the Lines may be a fairy tale, but it feels real. Prince Oliver is brave, adventurous, and loving. He really speaks to Delilah.

And then one day Oliver actually speaks to her. Turns out, Oliver is more than a one-dimensional storybook prince. He’s a restless teen who feels trapped by his literary existence and hates that his entire life is predetermined. He’s sure there’s more for him out there in the real world, and Delilah might just be his key to freedom.

Delilah and Oliver work together to attempt to get Oliver out of his book, a challenging task that forces them to examine their perceptions of fate, the world, and their places in it. And as their attraction to each other grows along the way, a romance blossoms that is anything but a fairy tale.

(My Opinion)

Between The Lines was written the perspective of Oliver, Delilah, and the Narrator. The characters’ were typical and felt like they were just words on paper, nothing they did made them come alive to me. I loved the idea for this story because it’s different and I was instantly interested in what it was about and about Oliver’s fate. The writing for this story annoyed me for some reason and there were a few words used in the wrong sense.

Oh man, where do I start? Okay how about the fact that the characters’ were so typical and boring that I almost stopped reading. Yup, this book had so much potential with this amazing idea but the characters didn’t pull throw nor did the writing style. This book didn’t have enough dialogue for me which is something that I didn’t like at all. There was too much explanation in the first few chapters. Delilah was a very typical character that was a loner, had problems with other people (which is fine) and stuff but there wasn’t anything interesting about her other than she could talk to Oliver. I wished the authors made her more mesmerizing and original. There were a lot of parts in the story where I was shaking my head because there were parts that seemed either rushed or disorganized and didn’t fit well with the story. Jules didn’t feel any real to me either and the fight between her and Delilah wasn’t good or entertaining. I was actually yawning while reading it.

Like I said before, the idea for this story is amazing and I loved it. Three stories wrapped up into one bigger story is great and usually exciting. I liked that the authors put the name of which character/narrator we were reading at the top of the page. My favourite parts of this book were the obstacles and challenges that Oliver and Delilah had to go through to find the right way to get Oliver out of the book.

I don’t think this book is a good read for anyone over the age of fourteen because you can bluntly tell that it won’t entertain anyone over that age. If you are a ‘grammar cop’ this book isn’t for you at all. This book might be enjoyable for young teens who like reading three stories in one book because I liked that.

Mutt ( book #1 in Rittenhouse saga) by Evan Fuller

4/5- When I first started reading I was thinking it was going to be a story similar to other dystopians that I’ve read. Luckily, the only thing they had in common were there had different kinds of people.

(Summary from Amazon)

Centuries after most of humanity died out, a new civilization is slowly constructed upon the remnants of the old. 

Emery, a young man living in the walled city of Rittenhouse, has taken it upon himself to rescue “mutts,” as the citizens of Rittenhouse call the impoverished masses outside. When Timothy, a boy afflicted with a fatal illness, seeks Emery’s help, the two embark on a deadly errand to secure the medicine Timothy needs. This mission takes them from the safety of Rittenhouse into the wasteland outside it, where ancient superstitions are reborn and humanity struggles to survive amidst the ruins of a fallen American metropolis.

(My Opinion)

First of all, I would like to thank Evan Fuller for giving me a copy of his book to review!

The plot for Mutt was well thought out and the characters were original and creative with a hint of good humour. Even though I didn’t like some things in this book, I still really enjoyed it. This book made me laugh at the awkward jokes and pulled at my heartstrings at the end. The ending was beautifully written.

The different kinds of purebloods in Rittenhouse were interesting and I liked that Evan Fuller put it in. What I wished he had done was added more description about the different types. I am still curious about the people who are Vorteil . The relationship between Emery and Lydia was a weird one. It wasn’t weird because they had a few obstacles but it was weird because to me, the relationship felt odd and unnatural. It felt like Evan Fuller put it in just for the sake of having it there. Sometimes a story needs romance, but other times, stories don’t. I think that this story would have been just as good without it.

What I loved about the book was the writing style, the way that most of the words flowed together and how Evan Fuller easily put words that were difficult into the text instead of just using ‘easy’ words. My favourite character throughout the book was Timothy because to me, he showed the most courage. Timothy was so ready to do things that he didn’t want to do and things that he was willing to do. Even though  Timothy was my favourite, I still loved the other characters as well. Evan Fuller really got his message across with this tale about how kindness will always help you when you truly need someone or something. Evan Fuller gave a lot of examples of kindness shared between the characters and how it benefitted them somehow in the end. Mutt by Evan Fuller is a great read for anyone who enjoys dystopian stories with adventure, danger, and being forced to trust people who you despise. I can only wonder when his next book will be coming out.