Book Review: The Godfather by Mario Puzo

The Godfather by Mario Puzo

Publisher: NAL

Genre: Classic

Release Date: 1969

Pages: 448

Almost fifty years ago, a classic was born. A searing portrayal of the Mafia underworld, The Godfather introduced readers to the first family of American crime fiction, the Corleones, and their powerful legacy of tradition, blood, and honor. The seduction of power, the pitfalls of greed, and the allegiance to family—these are the themes that have resonated with millions of readers around the world and made The Godfather the definitive novel of the violent subculture that, steeped in intrigue and controversy, remains indelibly etched in our collective consciousness.

I started this one because I loved the movie. The Godfather is just about fifty times better than the movie. With the novel being split up into relatively small books on individual characters, it’s action-packed with perfect pacing, seamlessly switching between multiple perspectives so readers get a full depiction on the characters. Seriously could not put it down.

Despite the large amount of love and respect I have for this novel, a few things didn’t add up for me. There is so much time is spent on lesser important secondary characters. An example would be the ridiculous amount given to Johnny Fontane, whom is a celebrity. His book in the novel doesn’t justify his role in the novel since it is so small.

Nonetheless, I love everything else. It’s very fast-paced with cleverly written dialogue. The book on Don Corleone is by far the best as it helps paints a beautiful picture of him as a realistic person and character. Timeframes are well put together, a lot of time has passed between a few of the books yet it feels like nothing has passed at all. More specifically, the writing is extremely smooth despite it being in third person which only adds to the story and gives it more diversity.

I know why everyone calls this a classic read. The best of the best, because it truly is. Everything is so realistic and intense, even people who don’t enjoy classics will have to make an exception for this one. It’s just that good.

4. 5 Bad-Ass Clouds

Book Review: Sylo (Sylo#1) by D. J. MacHale

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Sylo (Sylo#1) by D. J. MacHale

Publisher: Razorbill

Genre: Science Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: July 2, 2013

Pages: 407 (Hardcover)

good good

Does Tucker Pierce have what it takes to be a hero when the U.S. military quarantines his island?

Fourteen-year-old Tucker Pierce prefers to fly under the radar. He’s used to navigating around summer tourists in his hometown on idyllic Pemberwick Island, Maine. He’s content to sit on the sidelines as a backup player on the high school football team. And though his best friend Quinn tells him to “go for it,” he’s too chicken to ask Tori Sleeper on a date. There’s always tomorrow, he figures. Then Pemberwick Island is invaded by a mysterious branch of the U.S. military called SYLO. And sitting on the sidelines is no longer an option for Tucker, because tomorrow may never come.

It’s up to Tucker, Quinn, and Tori to uncover the truth about the singing aircraft that appears only at night—and the stranger named Feit who’s pushing a red crystal he calls the Ruby that brings unique powers to all who take it. Tucker and his friends must rescue not just Pemberwick Island, but the fate of the world—and all before tomorrow is too late.

opinion

After reading Sylo, I feel like the events that happened to Tucker and his friends could possibly happen to my precious city. That’s just how realistic everything in the novel is. The setting is a small town which is typical but the ending made up for that and so did the killer plot.

What I didn’t like about the book was that the writing sounds a little too mature for the main character and the constant repetition about ‘The First Death’ and “We’re being left in the dark” etc. just got really bothersome and I found myself skipping a few pages because that’s all they talk about. Sylo could have been cut down but at least thirty because of this or more answers could have been answered.

There is a romance in the novel but it takes the back seat the whole time, giving way to the super secretive evil-murderer people who are trying to take over the island. The plot itself is so exciting and realistic and for the most part, so are the characters. Tori and Tucker take the lead and even though they’re just teens, they show tremendous strengths and courage to save their home.

Anyway, this is such a fun novel! I need to get my hands on Storm and find out what happens to Tori and Tucker and how they get answers! I recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys science fiction novels and quite a few deaths along the way.

3.5 Dreamy Clouds
3.5 Dreamy Clouds

Book Review: Kindness for Weakness by Shawn Goodman

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 Kindness for Weakness by Shawn Goodman

Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: May 14, 2013

Pages: 272 (Hardcover)

good good

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest meets Catcher in the Rye.

A fifteen-year-old boy from an abusive home desperately seeking his older brother’s love and approval starts pushing drugs for him and suffers the consequences.

opinion

I was really rooting for this one. I loved the beginning, it’s very strong and exciting. It starts with a flashback and then we learn about where it sort of began.But after awhile, James’s story starts to get boring and at many times, he feels like a brick wall, only relying on books and other people to build his character up.

There are many book references in this novel! Too many for my taste. I can deal with one or two but Kindness for Weakness has around four book references which I found too confusing to remember at times. I also dislike that the story ruins one of the best books ever–The Outsiders– I mean, you just cannot do that. I’ll let one book slide, you can tell me the ending of a Jack London book because I most likely will never read another book of his again but not The Outsiders!

Not cool, man. Not cool.

Short chapters help the books that I dislike a lot solely because I am more committed to finishing them which is the case with this one. Chapters are about three or four pages that literally fly by. Moreover, I liked that I got both sides of the story, not just the good and not just the bad. It starts at the beginning with one of the biggest mistakes in his life and how he came to realize many things about the people around him. The world building is pretty decently done, the Morton facility feels realistic and mysterious, a feeling that I think the author was trying to go for.

Kindness for Weakness starts off great and had my attention from the very beginning but it quickly went downhill and lost it. Still, maybe I just the fact that I have extremely high expectations for novels that are me-novels and I’m very picky about everything with them. Nonetheless I recommend this to anyone who enjoys novels about messed-up teenagers like I do and don’t mind all the spoilers on some great books *coughs* The Outsiders *coughs* and are not very picky about the characters either. I’m hoping that Shawn Goodman’s other novel, Something Like Hope is much better than Kindness for Weakness. 

2.5 Clouds
2.5 Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.