Book Review: Linked (Linked#1) by Imogen Howson

14999965Linked (Linked#1) by Imogen Howson

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers

Genre: Science Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: June 11, 2013

Pages: 368 (Hardcover)

good good

Elissa used to have it all: looks, popularity, and a bright future. But for the last three years, she’s been struggling with terrifying visions, phantom pains, and mysterious bruises that appear out of nowhere.

Finally, she’s promised a cure: minor surgery to burn out the overactive area of her brain. But on the eve of the procedure, she discovers the shocking truth behind her hallucinations: she’s been seeing the world through another girl’s eyes.

Elissa follows her visions, and finds a battered, broken girl on the run. A girl—Lin—who looks exactly like Elissa, down to the matching bruises. The twin sister she never knew existed.

Now, Elissa and Lin are on the run from a government who will stop at nothing to reclaim Lin and protect the dangerous secrets she could expose—secrets that would shake the very foundation of their world.

opinion

Last year, there were these twins in my English class and they would usually finish each other`s sentences and holy crap! It was the coolest thing ever. With that being said, reading about twins that can see each other`s lives and feel the same emotions is crazy cool. I was instantly hooked to this one. However What I got was cool twin powers, sure, but that’s about it. The writing is choppy and awkward especially since it’s told in third person. Not enough is explained and I was bored and annoyed for most of the book.

There’s a lot that goes on in Linked that have problems. One of them is the setting and the world building. It’s poorly explained and I couldn’t imagine anything that happened. None of it makes enough sense especially the science fiction part. I thought the story would have been a lot better if the story was told as fantasy and not sci-fi. Another huge problem is the romance. Holy crap, is it bad! They haven’t seen or spoken to each other in months but he confesses his love for her? I understand that when you think you’re going to die, you will do some fucked up shit but this one just didn’t make sense! Their relationship from the beginning is told as a big brother little sister kind and I couldn’t see it as anything else.

Even though I had a few problems, I did like the relationship between the girls. They’re so unique and cool, especially their freaky twin powers.

Linked was not what I was expecting. I went in excited but finished confused and disappointed. I couldn’t picture anything that happened and I couldn’t believe the relationship between Elissa and that dude and the only good thing about it is the relationship between Elissa and Lin. I don’t recommend this book to anyone unless you’re one of those people who can either read and love everything, picture everything, or just really love science fiction novels.

 

2 Clouds

2 Clouds

Advertisements

Book Review: Noggin by John Corey Whaley

18051349Noggin by John Corey Whaley

Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: April 8, 2014

Pages: 342 (Hardcover)

good good

 

Listen — Travis Coates was alive once and then he wasn’t.

Now he’s alive again.

Simple as that.

The in between part is still a little fuzzy, but he can tell you that, at some point or another, his head got chopped off and shoved into a freezer in Denver, Colorado. Five years later, it was reattached to some other guy’s body, and well, here he is. Despite all logic, he’s still 16 and everything and everyone around him has changed. That includes his bedroom, his parents, his best friend, and his girlfriend. Or maybe she’s not his girlfriend anymore? That’s a bit fuzzy too.

Looks like if the new Travis and the old Travis are ever going to find a way to exist together, then there are going to be a few more scars.

Oh well, you only live twice.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Atheneum Books for Young Readers for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

Noggin is a story full of bad jokes, awkward situations, and horrible puns. And I loved every second of it. I didn’t feel like I was reading a work of fiction, instead, I felt as if I were reading a story, my story and my life of how I was brought back to life and forced to live in the present when I’m barely understanding the past. It’s weird, confusing, and such a fun ride. John Corey Whaley is an author  that I’ve been waiting for a long time and this will not be the last novel I’ve read by him.

Unfortunately, there are some downsides to this story. First of all, this whole situation is just too unbelievable and it took me some time before I could really wrap my head around it. No way did a dude get his head chopped off and then come back to life! That’s too insane. I understood that Travis is really confused about this whole concept as well yet I still would have liked it if Travis was just as curious about the scientific aspect as I was and other readers will be. It’s interesting yet not at all explained which sucked for me.

Nonetheless, I still loved this book. Noggin is full of great, complex characters that are extremely easy to like and relate to. Travis’s relationship with Kyle is so heartfelt and awkward. I could easily relate to it and the struggles that Kyle faces to understand everything that’s happening not only to him, but also to his best friend. I also liked the writing style. Holy shit, this is the writing that I have been craving for in young adult books. It’s so relaxed and casual and makes everything seem like it’s happening to the reader and just being told to the reader. I really do need more books written like this because they usually end up to be books that I really enjoy. The best part about Noggin has to be Travis’s last holiday before his surgery. It’s beautifully described and captivating. Imagine celebrating every single holiday in one day with a group of people you love most in the world? I would want that as my last day alive because it sounds absolutely amazing.

Overall, Noggin is great. Although there are a few unbelievable parts and too little information, the good certainly outshines the bad. I recommend this novel to everyone, especially if you’re looking for something light to read with a serious undertone and don’t mind a lot of jokes and puns. I envy those people who can easily make jokes out of anything, especially when they don’t take life too seriously and can make anyone smile and for me, John Corey Whaley might just be one of those people.

4 Dreamy Clouds

4 Dreamy Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: Uninvited (Uninvited#1) by Sophie Jordan

13645645Uninvited (Uninvited#1) by Sophie Jordan

Publisher: HarperTeen

Genre: Science Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: January 28, 2014

Pages: 384 (Hardcover)

good good

When Davy Hamilton’s tests come back positive for Homicidal Tendency Syndrome (HTS)-aka the kill gene-she loses everything. Her boyfriend ditches her, her parents are scared of her, and she can forget about her bright future at Juilliard. Davy doesn’t feel any different, but genes don’t lie. One day she will kill someone.

Only Sean, a fellow HTS carrier, can relate to her new life. Davy wants to trust him; maybe he’s not as dangerous as he seems. Or maybe Davy is just as deadly.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, HarperTeen for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

Uninvited isn’t a story about survival and murder. It’s a fucking love story. Despite all of the lovey-dovey bullshit, nothing about this makes sense. The romance mostly drives the story with the typical bad boy falls for the good girl theme and the characters are beyond pathetic. I thought this book would be more exciting, more action packed, but I didn’t get what I wanted. If I paid for this, I would be demanding for my money back.

Davy is a mess. All she does is whine and complain. I don’t understand the appeal of her other than she’s ‘innocent’. She judges everyone without a care in the world and believes that the doctors all made a mistakes, she doesn’t have the kill gene. It’s just not possible for someone so ‘gifted’. Reading about her and how special she is made my head hurt. I also hated just how unrealistic everything is. Davy and her friends go to a camp and there are eyes and ears everywhere so what do they do about this? Well, Davy and Sean don’t touch but they ever so casually speak of their plans for running away. They somehow get away from the camp without much trouble. Yeah fucking right. That’s not realistic, even if nobody heard their plans, it’s a place full of legit killers. There would be a least a few people awake and video cameras! They got out without a scratch and I hated how anticlimactic it all is.

Sophie Jordan has some of the greatest book ideas. The idea of people being quarantined for having the ‘kill gene’ is amazing! The way that people are still finding ways to fight people and judge them for how they’re born is interesting and I instantly fell in love with this idea. However that’s the only thing I fell in love with.

Overall, this is not worth it. Sure, it’s a great idea that will easily reel readers in but the character, unrealistic adventures, and disgusting romance ruins Uninvited. I don’t recommend this to anyone unless you’re not sick of romances taking over the story and the romances being the most typical thing ever.

1.5 Odd Clouds

1.5 Odd Clouds

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: Avalon (Avalon#1) by Mindee Arnett

17149396Avalon (Avalon#1) by Mindee Arnett

Publisher: Balzer & Bray

Genre: Science Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: January 21, 2014

Pages: 432 (Hardcover)

good good

Of the various star systems that make up the Confederation, most lie thousands of light-years from First Earth-and out here, no one is free. The agencies that govern the Confederation are as corrupt as the crime bosses who patrol it, and power is held by anyone with enough greed and ruthlessness to claim it. That power is derived from one thing: metatech, the devices that allow people to travel great distances faster than the speed of light.

Jeth Seagrave and his crew of teenage mercenaries have survived in this world by stealing unsecured metatech, and they’re damn good at it. Jeth doesn’t care about the politics or the law; all he cares about is earning enough money to buy back his parents’ ship, Avalon, from his crime-boss employer and getting himself and his sister, Lizzie, the heck out of Dodge. But when Jeth finds himself in possession of information that both the crime bosses and the government are willing to kill for, he is going to have to ask himself how far he’ll go to get the freedom he’s wanted for so long.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Balzer & Bray for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

I have always had a hard time with sci-fi novels, and this one is no different. The book starts off beautifully and kept my attention, but during the middle, the whole story falters and becomes very boring. This also happens for most, if not all of the characters. Their sneaky ways come to a screeching halt, and they are so bland that I would’ve rather eat original oatmeal. And I hate original oatmeal.

The Malleus Shades are known as one of the best thieves in the galaxy, but all I pictured while reading about them was this:

The Malleus Shades fall again and again fall for traps that logical people (me! For crying out loud I am so oblivious, but I saw all of those traps from miles away!) would easily spot. The fact that they’re teenagers shouldn’t be an excuse since they’ve been doing this shit for years. Their leader, Jeth, reminds me of this guy:

They have some many things in common. 1. They both have an intense, menacing aura around them. 2. They both like someone they shouldn’t. 3. THEY NEVER TALK. THEY SAY A FEW FUCKING LINES AND THEN THAT’S FUCKING IT. UGH. The dialogue is a bit tough since Jeth NEVER talks and most things are just in his head. There are certain parts in the novel where there are long information-dumps (near the end, don’t worry) that, albeit better done than other books, is still annoying.

But, I have to give Mindee Arnett props for the amazing world building. The planets that the crew visit are described in lovely detail that left just the right amount to readers to imagine. I have a hard time connecting with sci-fi books and even worse time when they’re written in the third person yet Arnett is talented. She writes beautifully in both first and third person, and I had almost no problems with the writing.

All in all, Avalon is a good book. The romance doesn’t take over the story (though it is a bit annoying), and there’s a nice twist in the book that had me eagerly flipping the pages. I recommend this book to anyone who loves sci-fi stories that’s a bit different and don’t mind bland characters. I can’t wait to read the next book mostly because of Cora and hopefully the characters get better. Especially Jeth because that boy says like, two lines per chapter. I’m not even kidding.

2.5 Mess Up Clouds

2.5 Mess Up Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: Sylo (Sylo#1) by D. J. MacHale

16101054

Sylo (Sylo#1) by D. J. MacHale

Publisher: Razorbill

Genre: Science Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: July 2, 2013

Pages: 407 (Hardcover)

good good

Does Tucker Pierce have what it takes to be a hero when the U.S. military quarantines his island?

Fourteen-year-old Tucker Pierce prefers to fly under the radar. He’s used to navigating around summer tourists in his hometown on idyllic Pemberwick Island, Maine. He’s content to sit on the sidelines as a backup player on the high school football team. And though his best friend Quinn tells him to “go for it,” he’s too chicken to ask Tori Sleeper on a date. There’s always tomorrow, he figures. Then Pemberwick Island is invaded by a mysterious branch of the U.S. military called SYLO. And sitting on the sidelines is no longer an option for Tucker, because tomorrow may never come.

It’s up to Tucker, Quinn, and Tori to uncover the truth about the singing aircraft that appears only at night—and the stranger named Feit who’s pushing a red crystal he calls the Ruby that brings unique powers to all who take it. Tucker and his friends must rescue not just Pemberwick Island, but the fate of the world—and all before tomorrow is too late.

opinion

After reading Sylo, I feel like the events that happened to Tucker and his friends could possibly happen to my precious city. That’s just how realistic everything in the novel is. The setting is a small town which is typical but the ending made up for that and so did the killer plot.

What I didn’t like about the book was that the writing sounds a little too mature for the main character and the constant repetition about ‘The First Death’ and “We’re being left in the dark” etc. just got really bothersome and I found myself skipping a few pages because that’s all they talk about. Sylo could have been cut down but at least thirty because of this or more answers could have been answered.

There is a romance in the novel but it takes the back seat the whole time, giving way to the super secretive evil-murderer people who are trying to take over the island. The plot itself is so exciting and realistic and for the most part, so are the characters. Tori and Tucker take the lead and even though they’re just teens, they show tremendous strengths and courage to save their home.

Anyway, this is such a fun novel! I need to get my hands on Storm and find out what happens to Tori and Tucker and how they get answers! I recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys science fiction novels and quite a few deaths along the way.

3.5 Dreamy Clouds

3.5 Dreamy Clouds

Book Review: Tandem (Many-Worlds Trilogy#1) by Anna Jarzab

15829686

Tandem (Many-Worlds Trilogy#1) by Anna Jarzab

Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers

Genre: Science Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: October 8, 2013

Pages: 428 (Hardcover)

good good

Everything repeats.
You. Your best friend. Every person you know.
Many worlds. Many lives–infinite possibilities.
Welcome to the multiverse.

Sixteen-year-old Sasha Lawson has only ever known one small, ordinary life. When she was young, she loved her grandfather’s stories of parallel worlds inhabited by girls who looked like her but led totally different lives. Sasha never believed such worlds were real–until now, when she finds herself thrust into one against her will.

To prevent imminent war, Sasha must slip into the life of an alternate version of herself, a princess who has vanished on the eve of her arranged marriage. If Sasha succeeds in fooling everyone, she will be returned home; if she fails, she’ll be trapped in another girl’s life forever. As time runs out, Sasha finds herself torn between two worlds, two lives, and two young men vying for her love–one who knows her secret, and one who thinks she’s someone she’s not.

First of all, I would like to thank the Publisher, Delacorte Books for Young Readers for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

Science fiction really isn’t a genre I like reading about and I’m not sure why that is, but my lack of comfort for this genre runs very deep (since I was a wee little thing) and most, if not all sci-fi books leave me with a ‘meh’ feeling and rarely get anything higher than an average rating from me. So I wasn’t surprised that by the end of Tandem that I was left with a bored feeling and nothing more. The novel starts off pretty well and then falls miserably down to boring and ends on a ‘meh’ note.

The worst part of Tandem is the middle where the story is pretty much formed. I had such a huge problem with it because it’s the same story as any other that has a princess. She either wants the prince and the guard or they both want her and it’s just so annoying and typical and I couldn’t take it. Another thing that I disliked is the world of Aurora since it only felt half done and 2-dimensional to me. I would have also liked the characters to be a lot less choppy and contrived. Many things about Thomas, especially his feelings towards Sasha feel very forced and odd.

Tandem does have a few good qualities that I found interesting like the idea of different worlds. This isn’t my first alternate universe novel so I’m a bit used to this idea but I love how Anna Jarzab adds a unique spin to this by making every person their own so that they’re not the exact same in two universes. That’s a very cool thing that I liked thinking about! The writing style for all three characters are fairly different, especially Thomas and Sasha and I found that I didn’t really mind the third person writing for Thomas because it fits well with the story.

For me, I feel really conflicted about how to rate this and how accurate I am about it. I did like the story, it’s entertaining as well as a little thought-provoking yet it’s also very bumpy and typical. However I still recommend this to anyone who enjoys novels about alternate universe and princesses that are stuck in the middle of things. Hopefully the second book in this trilogy will help me enjoy this genre more than I have in the past but that’s unlikely. Maybe I like them better in another universe?

3 Clouds

3 Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: Proxy (Proxy#1) by Alex London

16101023

Proxy (Proxy#1) by Alex London

Publisher: Philomel

Genre: Dystopian and Young Adult

Release Date: June 18, 2013

Pages: 384 (Hardcover)

good good

Knox was born into one of the City’s wealthiest families. A Patron, he has everything a boy could possibly want—the latest tech, the coolest clothes, and a Proxy to take all his punishments. When Knox breaks a vase, Syd is beaten. When Knox plays a practical joke, Syd is forced to haul rocks. And when Knox crashes a car, killing one of his friends, Syd is branded and sentenced to death.

Syd is a Proxy. His life is not his own.

Then again, neither is Knox’s. Knox and Syd have more in common than either would guess. So when Knox and Syd realize that the only way to beat the system is to save each other, they flee. Yet Knox’s father is no ordinary Patron, and Syd is no ordinary Proxy. The ensuing cross-country chase will uncover a secret society of rebels, test both boys’ resolve, and shine a blinding light onto a world of those who owe and those who pay. Some debts, it turns out, cannot be repaid.

opinion

Oh, Alex London, You had my attention from the first page, then lost it and then snatched it up again. The characters are well written and nicely developed, giving readers a protagonist they will love (Syd, I love that boy) and one to hate (Knox needs to get high-fived in the face. With a frying pan.) Unfortunately, the explanation behind the world building comes a little too late as well as the reasons for Knox being such an ass all of the time. Nonetheless, I really liked this one and can’t wait for the next.

The novel lost my attention during the middle, although it had a lot of action and suspense and just, aweness (for a lack of a better word) with Syd and Knox, I felt bored and found myself skimming the pages to get to the better parts. Syd and Egan are best friends but at many times, their relationship felt contrived to me and I couldn’t believe some of the things that Egan does in order to help Syd out. With that being said, it’s obvious that some things in this book feel too nicely done for my liking.

Syd is an awesome character, not only is he a character that I wanted to beat up all of the bad guys, I also wanted him to get the guy and have that happy ending that he so totally deserves. Even with him being the ‘chosen one’ it didn’t make too much of an annoying statement. I really liked the idea for the novel as well with and how it really uses the lesson, Everything has consequences to its advantage, London does an excellent job of portraying that. The book also doesn’t have a lot of romance in it which I loved! There was only enough that I think the author will bring it out some more in the next book but didn’t let it overtake the story. Proxy has a great ending also. I was expecting the whole thing to be predictable but then it wasn’t. The ending is really open, readers won’t be sure of anything.

Overall, quite a great read that I think a lot of people will enjoy. I recommend this to anyone who loves science fiction novels with an excellent message about life. I’m hoping that the sequel to Proxy will blow me away better than this one!

3.5 Dreamy Clouds

3.5 Dreamy Clouds