Book Review: The Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan

18170549The Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan

Publisher: Scribner

Genre: Essays, Fiction, and Non-Fiction

Release Date: April 8, 2014

Pages: 240 (Hardcover)

good good

 Marina Keegan’s star was on the rise when she graduated magna cum laude from Yale in May 2012. She had a play that was to be produced at the New York International Fringe Festival and a job waiting for her at the New Yorker. Tragically, five days after graduation, Marina died in a car crash.

As her family, friends, and classmates, deep in grief, joined to create a memorial service for Marina, her unforgettable last essay for the Yale Daily News, “The Opposite of Loneliness,” went viral, receiving more than 1.4 million hits. She had struck a chord.

Even though she was just twenty-two when she died, Marina left behind a rich, expansive trove of prose that, like her title essay, captures the hope, uncertainty, and possibility of her generation. The Opposite of Loneliness is an assemblage of Marina’s essays and stories that, like The Last Lecture, articulates the universal struggle that all of us face as we figure out what we aspire to be and how we can harness our talents to make an impact on the world.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Simon & Schuster  for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

When I was sent a copy of this book for review, I’ll admit, I was nervous. I never never read anything that isn’t young adult and fiction because I find it either too hard to relate to or too boring (History has never been a strong class for me). But I took a plunge and even though it took me forever and a year to finally finish it, I’m glad to that I did. It’s a moving art piece and even more so on their own. However, with each different section, I found my interest waning and waning until I had a hard time paying attention.

The book I believe is sectioned off into three pieces: Essays, fiction, and non-fiction. My attention started decreasing during the fiction part. I found Winter Break cute but completely pointless. When I finished the story, I was scratching my head trying to figure out why the fuck I cared about some girl and her long distance relationship and her parents not being in love. I didn’t care because nothing made it stand out to me which I found happens a lot in her short stories and more specifically, her characters. The characters throughout her stories are all right but I couldn’t  actually connect with them. They fell flat for me and I was quite disappointed by it. Moreover, for some reason, non fiction and I don’t click whatsoever so I had the hardest time getting through that part oh her book.

In addition to all of that, I did enjoy the essays and most of the fiction. There’s just something about her writing style that’s both enchanting and interesting that I couldn’t get enough of. I also liked how Keegan uses different formats and techniques to tell her stories from young adults to seniors and from a regular to emails. Her characters do have different lives and I enjoyed the diversity that she brought to them. Another thing that I enjoyed is the light humour that presents itself in a few stories to make things less serious.

The Opposite of Loneliness is an enjoyable read. There’s at least one story or essay that speaks to each reader. I recommend this one to anyone looking for something new to read and is willing to step out of their comfort zone for the first time. Although the characters are quite unique there are a bit underdeveloped but I liked how different each story is. I know I enjoyed it and I’m a little less terrified of stepping out of my comfort zone now.

3.5 Dreamy Clouds
3.5 Dreamy Clouds

Book Review: Dissonance (Dissonance#1) by Erica O’Rourke

17334538Dissonance (Dissonance#1) by Erica O’Rourke

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: July 22, 2014

Pages: 496 (Hardcover)

good good

Delancy Sullivan has always known there’s more to reality than what people see. Every time someone makes a choice, a new, parallel world branches off from the existing one. Eating breakfast or skipping it, turning left instead of right, sneaking out instead of staying in bed ~ all of these choices create an alternate universe in which an echo self takes the road not travelled and makes the opposite decision. As a Walker, someone who can navigate between these worlds, Del’s job is to keep all of the dimensions in harmony.

Normally, Del can hear the dissonant frequency that each world emits as clear as a bell. But when a training session in an off-key world goes horribly wrong, she is forbidden from Walking by the Council. But Del’s not big on following the rules and she secretly starts to investigate these other worlds. Something strange is connecting them and it’s not just her random encounters with echo versions of the guy she likes, Simon Lane.

But Del’s decisions have unimaginable consequences and, as she begins to fall for the Echo Simons in each world, she draws closer to a truth that the Council of Walkers is trying to hide ~ a secret that threatens the fate of the entire multiverse.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

Dissonance is  a well paced story that doesn’t delve into the science behind the multiverse too much. I had a lot of fun reading about Del’s crazy life and her hardships and those of the people around her. However, I wanted to like this one a lot for than I did. I wanted a kick ass heroine who knew how to make her own decisions without help. Del is a pretty badass character and I loved reading about her but I hated how much her life surrounded Simon even before everything went downhill. I wanted her to stick true to her image or at least to her goal. Still, a great novel that’s refreshing!

The beginning is the most confusing part of all. Although there is a lot of action and interesting things happening, there’s so most info-dumping and name dropping that it all felt like a huge whirlwind that barely made any sense. The romance is predictable and I disliked almost all of it. Nothing about Simon stood out to me and I  couldn’t understand the connection that Del has for him especially when she breaks a huge amount of rules to keep him from leaving her.

Nonetheless, Erica O’Rourke has taken an idea that’s starting to be more common in YA books and added a refreshing writing style and a new perspective. I couldn’t get enough of Del’s voice! It’s so different and reckless that I found myself staying up to get the book done. The world building is well done and very tricky considering all of the different choices and things that happen. I also liked how some chapters started off with a rule that Walkers have to follow.

Even though there are a few flaws in this book, for the most part, I really liked it. It’s fast paced and fully of cool twists. The characters are fun, the worlds are great, and even though the ending is predictable and crazy cheesy, I’m extremely excited to read the next book in this exciting new series. I recommend this book to anyone who’s read and liked stories about alternate universes and fun characters.

3.5 Dreamy Clouds
3.5 Dreamy Clouds

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: Linked (Linked#1) by Imogen Howson

14999965Linked (Linked#1) by Imogen Howson

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers

Genre: Science Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: June 11, 2013

Pages: 368 (Hardcover)

good good

Elissa used to have it all: looks, popularity, and a bright future. But for the last three years, she’s been struggling with terrifying visions, phantom pains, and mysterious bruises that appear out of nowhere.

Finally, she’s promised a cure: minor surgery to burn out the overactive area of her brain. But on the eve of the procedure, she discovers the shocking truth behind her hallucinations: she’s been seeing the world through another girl’s eyes.

Elissa follows her visions, and finds a battered, broken girl on the run. A girl—Lin—who looks exactly like Elissa, down to the matching bruises. The twin sister she never knew existed.

Now, Elissa and Lin are on the run from a government who will stop at nothing to reclaim Lin and protect the dangerous secrets she could expose—secrets that would shake the very foundation of their world.

opinion

Last year, there were these twins in my English class and they would usually finish each other`s sentences and holy crap! It was the coolest thing ever. With that being said, reading about twins that can see each other`s lives and feel the same emotions is crazy cool. I was instantly hooked to this one. However What I got was cool twin powers, sure, but that’s about it. The writing is choppy and awkward especially since it’s told in third person. Not enough is explained and I was bored and annoyed for most of the book.

There’s a lot that goes on in Linked that have problems. One of them is the setting and the world building. It’s poorly explained and I couldn’t imagine anything that happened. None of it makes enough sense especially the science fiction part. I thought the story would have been a lot better if the story was told as fantasy and not sci-fi. Another huge problem is the romance. Holy crap, is it bad! They haven’t seen or spoken to each other in months but he confesses his love for her? I understand that when you think you’re going to die, you will do some fucked up shit but this one just didn’t make sense! Their relationship from the beginning is told as a big brother little sister kind and I couldn’t see it as anything else.

Even though I had a few problems, I did like the relationship between the girls. They’re so unique and cool, especially their freaky twin powers.

Linked was not what I was expecting. I went in excited but finished confused and disappointed. I couldn’t picture anything that happened and I couldn’t believe the relationship between Elissa and that dude and the only good thing about it is the relationship between Elissa and Lin. I don’t recommend this book to anyone unless you’re one of those people who can either read and love everything, picture everything, or just really love science fiction novels.

 

2 Clouds
2 Clouds

Book Review: (Don’t You) Forget About Me by Kate Karyus Quinn

18599667(Don’t You) Forget About Me by Kate Karyus Quinn

Publisher: HarperTeen

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: June 10, 2014

Pages: 336 (Hardcover)

good good

Welcome to Gardnerville.

A place where no one gets sick. And no one ever dies.

Except…
There’s a price to pay for paradise. Every fourth year, the strange power that fuels the town exacts its payment by infecting teens with deadly urges. In a normal year in Gardnerville, teens might stop talking to their best friends. In a fourth year, they’d kill them.

Four years ago, Skylar’s sister, Piper, was locked away after leading sixteen of her classmates to a watery grave. Since then, Skylar has lived in a numb haze, struggling to forget her past and dull the pain of losing her sister. But the secrets and memories Piper left behind keep taunting Skylar—whispering that the only way to get her sister back is to stop Gardnerville’s murderous cycle once and for all.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, HarperTeen for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

 

With each chapter a salute to better music, this book is an awesome read. Sure, the music isn’t a huge part of the story but it’s still intense. The magic, the town, and the people. The in between chapter at first don’t make very much sense but after a while, they start to come together piece by piece. Unfortunately, the romance is contrived and pointless. I liked the love interest but he’s too predictable with him and how things plays out. Still, I liked this book! It’s really different.

The world building is pretty flimsy and spotty. Not very much is properly explained, I was left confused and only able to imagine half of this mysterious town. But that’s not the only thing that’s badly explained, there’s the relationship between Elton and Skylar that’s beyond half-assed. Even at the end, nothing about them is explained just like with the relationship between Foot and Skylar. Foot just sort of shows up and he has this blanket and then BAM! Everything and everyone is like, “OMG! This is the missing baby!” That’s it.

Nevertheless, I did like the writing. It’s really refreshing just like the cool way the author decided to name her chapters using song titles and then matching the song titles to the chapters. After I finished reading (Don’t You) Forget About Me I went and listened to all of the songs mentioned. The only relationship that I did enjoy reading is the one between Piper and Skylar which is amazing and is explained so well and is so realistic that I was pretty shocked once the truth came out by the end of the novel. I felt the pain that Skylar felt when her family told her the truth.

(Don’t You) Forget About Me is a mysterious story about a magical town. I loved the mood and the magic but hated the relationships and flimsy descriptions. Still, I recommend this to anyone who’s looking for something creative and different to read about. Also if you need help with some old tunes to listen to.

2.5 Mess Up Clouds
2.5 Mess Up Clouds

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: The Art of Lainey by Paula Stokes

16068910The Art of Lainey by Paula Stokes

Publisher: HarperTeen

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: May 20, 2014

Pages: 384 (Paperback)

good good

Soccer star Lainey Mitchell is gearing up to spend an epic summer with her amazing boyfriend, Jason, when he suddenly breaks up with her—no reasons, no warning, and in public no less! Lainey is more than crushed, but with help from her friend Bianca, she resolves to do whatever it takes to get Jason back.

And that’s when the girls stumble across a copy of The Art of War. With just one glance, they’re sure they can use the book to lure Jason back into Lainey’s arms. So Lainey channels her inner warlord, recruiting spies to gather intel and persuading her coworker Micah to pose as her new boyfriend to make Jason jealous. After a few “dates”, it looks like her plan is going to work! But now her relationship with Micah is starting to feel like more than just a game.

What’s a girl to do when what she wants is totally different from what she needs? How do you figure out the person you’re meant to be with if you’re still figuring out the person you’re meant to be?

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, HarperTeen for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

The Art of Lainey isn’t a book for everyone. Sure, for some,  it’s cute and light and a great book to read in between heavy novels but for others, it’ll be annoying and unrealistic. This novel has both good and bad qualities and although I liked it, I wished I could have liked it more. Hopefully Paula Stokes fixes these problems with her next novel.

Like I said before, Lainey is a hit or miss kind of character yet I found myself in the middle with her. She’s refreshing with her sense of light humour but she only thinks about Jason and soccer. It’s like nothing else exists to this girl except these two things which isn’t very realistic and really annoying. Another thing that I had a problem with is the lack of history the characters have. Because of this everything felt very forced and fake to me, there are only a few examples of how things were with characters before they got dumped like the relationship that Jason and Lainey had before. It’s pretty non-existent to the reader because there aren’t many examples of how much fun they had together or many flashbacks. The book mostly consists of Lainey telling readers how much she loves him and nothing more.

Every chapter in the book starts off with a quote from The Art of War which I thought was really good because it summed up some of the chapters. I liked how Paula Stokes decided to use a quote and then write a chapter surrounding that quote, it’s well done. What I love most about cute books like this one are the relationships between the characters, the way they interact and make each other laugh, cry, scream, etc. With Lainey and Micah, it’s so much fun! Their bickering and sarcastic banter is light-hearted and cute and my favourite thing about The Art of Lainey. Moreover, I just adored Micah! I loved his whole tough guy personality because it’s actually meaningful. He’s not doing t because he’s dying to fit in, or because he’s mad. He’s the way he is because he’s comfortable with himself despite the world and I loved that. I also loved his sarcasm and how realistic he is. The ending is fairly well done, I liked how things aren’t straightforward and the many obstacles that stand in Lainey’s way of happiness.

All in all, I still found this book to be really cute. Lainey learns a few things and I liked how her character grows throughout the story, understanding the views of her friends instead of just blindly following. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys cute books with a plan to get an ex back.

3 Clouds
3 Clouds

Book Review: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

18339662We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Publisher: Delacorte Press

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: May 13, 2014

Pages: 227 (Hardcover)

good good

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Delacorte Press for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

We Were Liars relies heavily on its setting to tell the story and despite the rating I really liked this one. It’s different from the other novels I’ve read with the writing style and the atmosphere. If it weren’t for the setting and the fact that it’s so well put together, I think that this book would have been boring and typical. Nonetheless, I enjoyed reading about this, Lockhart made the writing work and held my attention for most of the book. 

My biggest problem is how Lockhart dealt with the truth. She could have went in a ton of different directions yet she didn’t. And I had to lower my rating because of that. I skimmed a few reviews so I already had a vague idea of what happens or what ‘they’ are and I think that that’s well done.The characters delicately use the information of the past to remind our protagonist yet in a way that wouldn’t trigger another episode and keep readers guessing as to what really happened. However well the characters react, I still didn’t actually like them. They’re all rich and spoiled and whiny especially the mothers. I didn’t understand Cadence’s mother and felt that Lockhart left her unfinished or undecided because she’s mean and then she’s loving in a way that doesn’t make enough sense. 

Although I disliked the characters, I surprisingly liked the writing style and I really hate the poetic writing with close to no dialogue at all but it fits the story, giving it a unique style in a pretty confusing way. I also liked the stories and variations that are included because they’re different, dark, and exciting and I loved how the variations connected with the chapter that it’s featured in. Like I mentioned before, the setting really makes We Were Liars and I can’t stress enough how important a setting is regardless and the author does a fine job with it.

All in all, I liked this book, truly. I’m not the kind of person who enjoys reading about rich people complaining about being less rich and writing that’s more poetic and boring than anything but the mysterious setting and creepy truth does make up for it. At least, it did for me and for anyone who enjoys confusing stories and a different way of a story being told and don’t mind weak characters.

3 Clouds
3 Clouds

Book Review: A Creature of Moonlight by Rebecca Hahn

creature of moonlightA Creature of Moonlight by Rebecca Hahn

Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: May 6, 2014

Pages: 224 (Hardcover)

good good

 As the only heir to the throne, Marni should have been surrounded by wealth and privilege, not living in exile-but now the time has come when she must choose between claiming her birthright as princess of a realm whose king wants her dead, and life with the father she has never known: a wild dragon who is sending his magical woods to capture her.

opinion

A Creature of Moonlight is 2% dialogue, 3% interesting stories about the woods, and 95% boredom which is just Marni talking to herself using beautiful prose and similes. Honestly, let’s put aside the fact that many adults read young adult novels and stick to the fact that this book is for young people. Slim, very slim are the chances that teenagers want to read a boring story that’s lyrically enchanting than anything else. Teenagers want action! Betrayal! and unfortunately sometimes, romance! We don’t want to read something that will almost instantly put us to sleep. If I wanted to sleep I would ask my mom to tell me about school when she was growing up. Somehow, I managed to finish this one but I fell asleep at least ten times along the way.

I can see why some people love the writing style, you really need to be interested in it to actually enjoy it though. However, for others (like myself) the writing is too formal and long. There’s an endless line of similes and metaphors and other crap to make the writing pretty pretty but also very boring. I couldn’t help but smack myself once I started the second chapter. The writing makes everything so long and pointless and awkward, the story feels far less like a story and more like an essay about some pointless crap no one actually cares about. I also had a problem with the plot itself, it’s also pointless and typical. Girl has nothing left, wants happiness, meets her father, blah blah blah, realizes crap and runs, blah blah blah, finds true home. That’s the whole story, nothing interesting, I promise. The characters are worse than wet cement, they barely do anything, there’s close to no dialogue, and when things are just starting to get good because of an almost-romance, it’s taken away and readers are left with boring shit again.

Nonetheless, I did like the stories about the woods. These small stories are well done and will instantly captivate readers which is good but also bad because they are spread out and have tons of boring stuff in between them all.

This book is just bad. I think I knew I was in for something horrible the second I read the second line, but I kept going forward because I was hoping that the writing would get better or at least I would like the main character. I didn’t. I barely liked anything about the book and I don’t recommend it to anyone. It’s tedious, typical, and annoying. I’m tempted to put a hiatus on dragon books for the time being since everyone that I’ve read has been absolute crap.

1 Lonely Cloud
1 Lonely Cloud

Book Review: The Break-Up Artist by Philip Siegel

17684323The Break-Up Artist by Philip Siegel

Publisher: Harlequin Teen

Genre: Contemporary and Young Adult

Release Date: April 29, 2014

Pages: 336 (Hardcover)

good good

 Some sixteen-year-olds babysit for extra cash. Some work at the Gap. Becca Williamson breaks up couples.


After watching her sister get left at the altar, Becca knows the true damage that comes when people utter the dreaded L-word. For just $100 via paypal, she can trick and manipulate any couple into smithereens. With relationship zombies overrunning her school, and treating single girls like second class citizens, business is unfortunately booming. Even her best friend Val has resorted to outright lies to snag a boyfriend.

One night, she receives a mysterious offer to break up the homecoming king and queen, the one zombie couple to rule them all: Steve and Huxley. They are a JFK and Jackie O in training, masters of sweeping faux-mantic gestures, but if Becca can split them up, then school will be safe again for singletons. To succeed, she’ll have to plan her most elaborate scheme to date and wiggle her way back into her former BFF Huxley’s life – not to mention start a few rumors, sabotage some cell phones, break into a car, and fend off the inappropriate feelings she’s having about Val’s new boyfriend. All while avoiding a past victim out to expose her true identity.

No one said being the Break-Up Artist was easy.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Harlequin Teen for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

What I would give to have someone like Becca at my school. Someone who is annoyed with people who absolutely find everything romantic and crank it to a disgusting level. It’s annoying how everyone in high school (and I’m sure this happens in all high schools) expect to find the love of their life at such a young age. The Break Up Artist is a reality check for most teenagers. It goes right up to some of the most loved movies of all time and pokes them in the eye and starts yelling at them that they’re stupid. I loved every second of it. This story made me laugh and had me reeling and ready to spit fire at many people. Overall, it’s a fun ride that many people will enjoy and agree with.

The bad thing about novels that have a serious underlining yet a light-hearted demeanour is that they often aren’t realistic at times and although I wanted to overlook some of these incidents in this one, there seems to be too many for me to do that. Becca is the Break Up Artist and leaves her email in quite a public place yet throughout the novel, she only gets two couples to break up in the span of months. Other couples are mentioned in passing but that’s it, it’s hard to believe that such a business would only have  one costumer at a time when a lot of people at this high school are getting dumped by their best friends for their relationships. I also had a problem for how the break ups are done, since after the couples break up, that’s it. There’s no more mention on how they’re doing or follow-up. It’s as if the author was too eager to get to the better parts and not describe these littles ones and I felt let down by it.

Becca is great. She’s realistic and understands that romance isn’t everything, especially when it comes to friendship. I instantly liked her and her snarky attitude towards most things like school and her ex-best friend. It was pretty hard not to enjoy reading about her.  I loved how Becca fought with her inner self at many times during the story, especially when a boy came in between her and her friend with Val. It’s done well and I was very excited and angry once Becca realized a few things to make up what she believed was more important to her. The relationship between Val and Becca is well done, I really liked that they’re relationship isn’t always strong, that they had a few obstacles because this made it really realistic and fun to read about although it is at times sad.

The Break-Up Artist is a great novel not only for young adults. With strong, funny characters and a serious message about living past the love, this story will appeals to almost everyone. I had so much reading it and I can’t wait to see what Siegel has next. I recommend this to everyone, especially if you’re looking for a light-hearted novel with a few clichés in it.

3.5 Dreamy Clouds
3.5 Dreamy Clouds

Book Review: Talker 25 (Talker 25#1) by Joshua McCune

17339959Talker 25 by Joshua McCune

Publisher: Greenwillow Books

Genre: Fantasy and Young Adult

Release Date: April 22, 2014

Pages: 432 (Hardcover)

good good

 

It’s a high school prank gone horribly wrong-sneaking onto the rez to pose next to a sleeping dragon-and now senior Melissa Callahan has become an unsuspecting pawn in a war between Man and Monster, between family and friends and the dragons she has despised her whole life. Chilling, epic, and wholly original, this debut novel imagines a North America where dragons are kept on reservations, where strict blackout rules are obeyed no matter the cost, where the highly weaponized military operates in chilling secret, and where a gruesome television show called Kissing Dragons unites the population. Joshua McCune’s debut novel offers action, adventure, fantasy, and a reimagining of popular dragon lore.

First of all, I would like to thank the publisher, Greenwillow Books for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

 

Close your eyes (do it.) Now, imagine a mythical creature that terrifies you, it’s okay you don’t have to tell anyone what it is. Got it? Good. Keep that creature in your head, think of how scary and fucked up it is, now turn it into a fluffy adorable version of itself. Disney-fy the shit out of it if you have to. That, is what you get in Talker 25. You get these badass creatures lying around sleeping and then getting ridden like some kind of pet. That’s pretty much it and I’m sad to say it never gets any better.

Melissa, Mel, Callahan, whatever you want to call our protagonist is an idiot who thinks she’s brave and has a lot of spunk. She doesn’t. She’s just stupid and naive. Half the time, she doesn’t make sense. She has spent the better of three years fearing and hating dragons because of what they did to her mother, yet at the first chance she gets, she rides them. Why? Did I miss something in this sudden change? It makes no sense, if something killed my mother I would not under ant circumstance befriend it/them. On top of that, nothing is well explained. There are three types of dragons yet all I really understand about the green ones are that they’re the most military like. The other two are lost causes to me nor do I care about them. The romance is also very pathetic and annoying since we have the protagonist be a snotty brat one second and then worried about the way she looks the next when a complete stranger who was following her knows her name. It’s so forced and I really didn’t see what the love interest saw in her.  To make matters worse is the military, the US can make these insane weapons yet can’t keep some teenagers out of a dangerous compound? The military in the book is a complete joke, maybe worse than the protagonist and the romance combined. They do nothing, think of nothing, and just allow these teenagers into the compound with fucking Dragons and don’t even send these kids to jail because, “they were just having some fun.” What the hell is this book? I believe in having fun and taking chances but this is a damn dragon compound. These kids could get killed and it seems that the military would still sit on their asses. *Shakes head*.

What did I like about this big joke of a novel? Believe it or not, despite the super cheesy summary, I was expecting something exciting and I liked what I thought was the concept of this story. Turns out that was a joke too.

Talker 25 is just bad, from every angle. From the first page, I was confused. Dragons aren’t some kind of side plot, they are the plot or at least should be, so I would like to know about them before the 30% mark other than they’re red or blue or green and the red and blue can mate. What the fuck am I supposed to do with that information? It also doesn’t help that no one can make up their fucking minds on what the fuck to call our protagonist and I’m aware that this is silly but it’s not. One sentence her friends are calling her Callahan, and then the next they’re calling her Mel. Why? No reason, it’s not to show anger or anything. I don’t recommend this one to anyone because it is absolutely horrid and stupid and bad and you will either get really angry or really sleepy reading it.

1 Lonely Cloud
1 Lonely Cloud

 

For quotes from this book, click here.

Book Review: The Ring and the Crown by Melissa De La Cruz

18296016The Ring and the Crown by Melissa De La Cruz

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Genre: Historical Fiction and Young Adult

Release Date: April 1, 2014

Pages: 384 (Hardcover)

good good

Princess Marie-Victoria, heir to the Lily Throne, and Aelwyn Myrddn, bastard daughter of the Mage of England, grew up together. But who will rule, and who will serve?

Quiet and gentle, Marie has never lived up to the ambitions of her mother, Queen Eleanor the Second, Supreme Ruler of the Franco-British Empire. With the help of her Head Merlin, Emrys, Eleanor has maintained her stranglehold on the world’s only source of magic. She rules the most powerful empire the world has ever seen.

But even with the aid of Emrys’ magic, Eleanor’s extended lifespan is nearing its end. The princess must marry and produce an heir or the Empire will be vulnerable to its greatest enemy, Prussia. The two kingdoms must unite to end the war, and the only solution is a match between Marie and Prince Leopold VII, heir to the Prussian throne. But Marie has always loved Gill, her childhood friend and soldier of the Queen’s Guard.

Together, Marie and Aelwyn, a powerful magician in her own right, come up with a plan. Aelwyn will take on Marie’s face, allowing the princess to escape with Gill and live the quiet life she’s always wanted. And Aelwyn will get what she’s always dreamed of–the chance to rule. But the court intrigue and hunger for power in Lenoran England run deeper than anyone could imagine. In the end, there is only rule that matters in Eleanor’s court: trust no one.

First of all, I would like to thank the public Relations coordinator, Annie Jackson/Small Girls PR for giving me an ARC of this book to review. Thank you so much! Really appreciate it! All right, now for my review.

opinion

This book, right here, is one the reasons why I stay far, far away from historical fiction books as well as books about princesses. They are always predictable, there is no (or barely anything) real talk about wars, enemies, etc. It’s all just romance and scandals and who’s fucking who or who wants to fuck who but not allowed to. I honestly felt like I was reading about the girls in my high school rather than an empire on the verge of collapsing. The characters are so one-sided and superficial that I had to skip a few chapters for one character because her life consists honestly, of only money and romance. That’s it. Nothing else. In fact, this is all the main characters care about, romance. Not about anything important.

The novel starts off with a lot of description. Aelwyn returns to the palace after four years. The bad thing about this novel is that it’s all fluff. Like I mentioned before, all the characters are one-sided, especially Ronan (the idiot who care only about money and romance). I could not, for the life of me, give two shits about the ridiculous shit that she goes through. More than once, I had to skip her chapter because I knew that I would give no fucks about what she has to say.

Despite the fact that just about everything important annoyed me, once I shut off my brain, I actually started to enjoy The Ring and the Crown a bit. I really enjoyed the ending, it’s so shocking and exciting. The writing is all right, I didn’t necessarily despise it, it’s well down with the palace and I liked a little French that’s put in it here and there. I also liked the magical aspect of the story although I would have loved it even more if there was more of it, more back story to it.

The Ring and the Crown is can be fun if not thought about at all.  I recommend this one only if you’ve read and enjoyed historical fiction with royalty and enjoyed all the scandals and romances and whatnot. There’s not very much meaning to this story and is solely for entertainment and I was really upset reading this and I don’t know if I’ll read any of De La Cruz’s other series. Though I might finish this series in the hopes that these characters grow the fuck up and decide that life isn’t all about stupidity.

2.5 Mess Up Clouds
2.5 Mess Up Clouds